The 4 Most Common Encaustic Painting Woes & How to Fix Them

Encaustic is an amazing painting medium and I’m sad when I hear that artists have given it up because of a problem that could have easily been fixed with knowing only one useful tip. If you’re having painting bothers, read on for the rescue.

I’ve been teaching encaustic painting since 2005 and throughout my teaching I have noticed four major recurring issues, problems and mistakes that many (beginner to advanced) encaustic painters encounter. Application, temperature, translucency and fusing issues are the infamous four problems. Even more of a problem is that these issues are difficult to pinpoint as some beginning painters may think it’s just the medium itself and give up before they really get started. Intermediate and advanced painters may have learned to adapt, but still end up getting frustrated. Encaustic is an amazing painting medium and its so sad when I hear that artists have given it up because of a problem that could have easily been fixed with knowing only one useful tip.

So if you’re having some painting bothers (both encaustic medium and pigmented encaustic paint), don’t throw down your brushes in disgust just yet…read on for the rescue. I’d like to preface by saying, if you’re heavy handed, a texture fiend, a fuse monster or anything else on this list and it doesn’t bother you….by all means, do you! Just make sure you have the control you want when it’s applicable and you’re obtaining desired results.

  1. PROBLEM Application– This is the number one issue on my list because this is where it all begins–if your application goes wrong, it’s pretty much a melty mess from there. Encaustic application is affected by many factors: the amount of paint on the brush, the size of the brush, the type of the brush and the angle of the brush as well as the temperature of the paint, which I address below in #2. Improper paint application can cause issues with too much texture, blurring or obscuring collage elements, wasting paint/medium, not to mention endless frustration.
    FIX Try using a smaller brush. Seriously, I know those 4-inch brushes are luscious, but you don’t need one that large when you’re painting on anything smaller than a 36×36 inch panel and even then I would question it’s use. The brush size should reflect the panel size and/or the function of the stroke. For example, I never go above a 1.5 inch brush when applying medium over collage and I have several sizes below 1.5 in my medium skillet. When painting, you can get a bit larger, but stay proportionate to the size of your panel and/or the effect you’re trying to achieve.
    FIX Try a different type of brush/tool. Most encaustic painters prefer hake brushes to chip brushes as they hold a nice amount of paint and make a nice smooth stroke when needed. However, if you’re not getting the results you like with a brush, try an alternative application tool, such as a palette knife or squeegee. See this blog post for how to make an alternative brush from flashing.
    FIX Scrape off excess paint. If your brushes are sitting in cups or skillets of paint/medium and you’re not scraping them, you’re likely applying too much. Any brush, especially a hake is just sitting in there soaking up the wax. Try scraping the brush on the side of the cup once or twice. This works wonders, trust me.
    FIX Adjust the angle. Because of the way a hake brush is made, it holds most of the paint at the base. So if you’re looking for a lot of paint to flow smoothly, try holding the brush at a 45 degree angle to the substrate with a gentle pressure instead of just the tip of the brush touching the substrate.
  2. PROBLEM Too much Texture This problem is very much related to application, but it’s a solo number on this list because it’s possibly the most annoying and prevalent issue in encaustic painting. This is also one of those problems that can cause someone to either begrudgingly accept it or quit encaustic altogether.
    FIX Adjust the Temperature. So simple, yet it’s ignored or not sufficiently attended to. The proper working temperature for encaustic painting is 200 degrees Fahrenheit….nothing less and sometimes more! More people than I can count do not keep their paint hot enough for proper encaustic painting. I use a pancake griddle in my unheated studio and in the winter I usually have it at 225F. Most pancake griddles are not meant to be working for hours at a time, so the heating elements are not accurate. If your wax is cooling on your brushes and too much texture is on your substrate, your wax is simply not hot enough.
    FIX Load Your Brush. While having too much paint on your brush may cause problems, having too little can be problematic as well. If you’re mixing your paint directly on the griddle and not in cups, chances are you’re not loading your brush. Make sure you have a nice puddle of paint, your brush is laid flat as you soak it up (not just the tip) and you load both sides of the brush.
    FIX Keep your brushes warm. During painting, your brushes should always be kept in the cups or on your griddle to keep them warm. When they begin to cool as you paint, lay them flat for few seconds on the griddle to warm up.
  3. PROBLEM Too much Opacity, No Translucency. One of the most amazing things about encaustic is its wonderful translucency and yet, I see very few artists taking advantage of this gift. Most are adding way too much pigment and not enough medium and/or not understanding that translucency is even an option to take their work to the next level. The ability to look through the layers to embedded information creates interest and encourages the viewer to remain engaged with your work. The key to translucency lies in the paint mixing.
    FIX Add color to Medium. In my teaching, I see way too many artists adding medium to their melted paint in order to create a translucent glaze and then end up using ten pounds of medium for a single color. Instead, add color to the medium to create a glaze. Melt a small amount of medium in your color cup or on the palette and then add a very small amount of color to create a tint. Keep adding color in very small increments until the desired color/translucency is achieved. Color test as you add. You will be amazed at how this changes your color mixing knowledge as well as the look of your paintings.
  4. PROBLEM Over fusing I can’t tell you how many (mostly beginners) tell me that they love what they painted, but when they fuse it, it gets all smushed together and ruined. While fusing is definitely necessary, there are various levels and various fusing tools that can be implemented according to the technique you’re employing. For the purposes of this article, I am focusing only on painting and not collage or other mixed media.
    FIX Try another tool. I use three tools for fusing; an iron, a heat gun and a torch. Many beginners start encaustic painting with the torch and only use it for the duration of their careers. This is fine if it’s working for you, but in many situations, it isn’t working. I always say, begin with a heat gun and gradually add in the torch. Also, most expensive heat guns are way too hot and heavy for what you need. I love my embossing tool and have used it since the beginning. It’s exactly what I need and if I need anything stronger, I use my torch.
    FIX Don’t Fuse Every Layer. What??? Yes, that’s what I said. If you’re fusing every single application of paint, you likely have a very hot surface you’re working on and this is creating a hot waxy mess instead of a painting. Okay, if you’re a heavy handed painter, you should probably fuse every 1-2 layers. But if you’re applying thin to medium strokes and those strokes are only in one part of the painting, I recommend only fusing every 2-4 layers. Your substrate is already warm enough from your last fusing and therefore doesn’t need another right after you just applied new hot paint. Many people are perplexed when I tell them this liberating fact after they have been over-fusing for so many years. I have paintings out in the world that are now over 20 years old and they are still in excellent shape. Try it! Trust me, you’ll thank me later.
    FIX Employ the The Glazed Donut Standard. Many encaustic painters seem to be mistaken in thinking that in order to properly fuse, the wax needs to be brought back to a molten state or close to it and this is just not the case. It’s for this reason that many painters sadly obliterate their paintings. But for the foundation layers, it’s only in very few cases that you would ever need to fuse back to a molten state. For the most part, most fusing should render the surface no more shinier than a glazed donut and this is where the standard on your fusing scale begins. Sometimes you will need to fuse more than a glazed donut, sometimes less, but this is the fusing surface you are attempting to achieve.

My Discovery of Mars (Not the Planet, Silly)

Just like the planet Mars has been around forever, so have R&F Paints’ Mars Encaustic colors, only I just discovered them while at my Brown Pink Residency…my trip to Mars took a few turns, it seems. I’m speaking specifically of Mars Red, Mars Orange and Mars Violet. Although I have all of them in my home studio collection, I’ve never used them. Even after working with encaustic for over twenty years, I often forget that a lot of the colors look wildly different when they’re melted, especially the more earth based tones.

Just like the planet Mars has been around forever, so have R&F Paints’ Mars Encaustic colors, only I just discovered them while at my Brown Pink Residency…my trip to Mars took a few turns, it seems. I’m speaking specifically of Mars Red, Mars Orange and Mars Violet. Although I have all of them in my home studio collection, I’ve never used them. In fact, my Mars Violet is so old it’s still donned with discontinued packaging format and is likely a collectors item at this point.

Why I avoided these colors (and others) is only somewhat relevant to this article and a subject I would like to revisit more in depth in a later post. In terms of the Mars colors, it seems I just reached for colors I was more familiar with using and which happened to be near enough in color for what I wanted-or so I thought. Even after working with encaustic for over twenty years, I often forget that a lot of the colors look wildly different when they’re melted, especially the more earth based tones. Yes, of course, I have my R&F color chart proudly displayed and I consult with it often. However, when I’m in ‘the zone’, it’s difficult to get me to look at anything else other than what I’m painting.

So why did I pick up the Mars colors at Brown Pink? Because they were there, I wasn’t in my home studio where my colors are organized differently and because I was at a paint company’s residency, I was in an ‘experiment with colors’ mindset. For a few years now, I’ve been working with a certain color group; blacks, whites and grays as the base with blues, pinks, reds and browns as highlights. If greens and yellows enter in, it’s more of the dark olives and ochres respectively. I use these colors because they connect to both landscape and the body, the notion of which is conceptually at the core of my work. While I was at the residency, I totally got into the fact that I had the entire R&F color line in front of me so why not try other things. I know what I like, but that doesn’t mean I know everything.

The following is a list of the colors and how they differ from the colors I normally use that are within the same range. I also discuss how I paired them next to and with other colors and you can see some of the results in the images below. Additionally, I have included inspiration photos I’ve recently taken where these colors show up in nature. Take note of the color combinations in the photos, this is what I do for inspiration when creating color palettes. Please check out my favorite encaustic colors blog posts for more about color and how I use it here and here. Going forward, my new studio life on Mars is looking pretty good!

Mars Red I’m so in love with this color! The reds I pick up without fail are Alizarin Crimson, Turkey Red and Warm Pink, with Alizarin Crimson being the one I use most to hint at the body, blood, flesh, etc. However, I was always trying to tone down the violet undertones in AC, it just seemed more lively than a sanguine color. When I picked up the Mars Red, there was an instant recognition that it was the color I was always trying to mix…an aha moment, for sure. I mixed it with Alizarin as well as Brown Pink and all were amazing rich reds. In addition, I can’t tell you how often I search for the Perfect Pink and usually begin with Warm Pink and several other colors to move it toward a salmon, peach or violet pink, but still always left me wanting that Perfect Pink. When mixed with any white, Mars Red makes the pink of my dreams and created the best watercolor sunsets in my landscape mono-prints. Last, a great combination is painting this color next to any blue or blue-toned color to make both colors sing. In the images below, I used combinations of Payne’s Gray, Cerulean Extra Pale, Cerulean Gray and Cobalt Teal.

Mars Orange The oranges I use most are Alizarin Orange and Burnt Sienna and Indian Yellow, which I count as an orange. In fact, I have to say that these are the only oranges I use as I’m not particularly drawn to yellows and oranges. However, I do have a deep love of the ‘red earth’ of the desert as well as the ‘black water’ in Northern Florida where I travel to do my self-made residencies (images below). These are the oranges I’m attracted to in nature and I tend to pick up the Burnt Sienna and Brown Pink when I want to replicate it. Mars Orange by itself is exciting, but it totally pops Burnt Sienna and Brown Pink when they are mixed with it. The best mix is Mars Orange and Mars Red for a very rich, earthy red. For a little extra zing, add in to that mix a small amount of Cobalt Yellow, Cad Lemon or Olive Yellow. Just like Mars Red, Mars Orange sings when paired next to any Blue/Green color and I would add Phthalo Green Pale, Malachite Green, Turkey Umber Greenish and Celadon to the list of pairings.

Mars Violet I never use purples or violets, but this color is deceptively named as it’s very close to Sepia and Brown Pink. Both Sepia and MV have purple(ish) undertones when compared with other browns, Mars Violet being richer, a little more red and a tad brighter, while Sepia is a bit darker, more violet and closer to a classic brown. I likely never picked up the Mars Violet because I’m totally in love with Sepia and Brown Pink and always reach for them first. Mars Violet bridges the gap and adds a richness between Brown Pink and Magenta. In the images below, you’ll see I mixed this color with Payne’s Gray to make a lovely dark gray and when mixed with Neutral White and/or Brilliant Yellow Extra Pale, it makes a still lovelier pale gray with a violet undertone. I found it’s best when painted next to rich oranges and reds, whites and my favorite pairing color, Turkey Umber Greenish.

Setting up Your Encaustic Studio: Materials & Equipment in Detail

I have received so many emails and questions asking about my encaustic studio set-up and the equipment in it, I decided to write a post about it so it’s all right here for everyone to reference.

Happy New Year! A little late, but better late than never.

The past few years have brought about many changes in everyone’s lives and as evidenced by the amount of questions I have received on the subject, it seems that many are relocating, downsizing and/or updating their encaustic studio spaces. I have received so many emails and questions asking about my personal encaustic studio set-up and the equipment in it, I decided to write a post about it so it’s all right here for everyone to reference.

My studio space is a little over 300 square feet and about a third of it is devoted to encaustic and cold wax, so a lot of magic happens in a very small space. I have never boasted a fancy space, you’ll not see me in a pristine Instagram photoshoot making paintings while donned in roller skates and a bikini-I’m a real person, making real art in a real studio, down and dirty. So if you’re here to look at an amazing studio space, this ain’t the place to do that. I’m here to show you that you don’t need anything especially fancy, large or expensive in order to make good art.

It seems that many artists have been inquiring about downsizing rather than upgrading and my studio is definitely a downsize from most, so I think this article will be helpful. For space organization and equipment ideas, see the images below as well as a list with purchase links. If you see something in the photos that I don’t list, please email me or leave a comment. Everything listed below can be purchased at my Everything Encaustic Amazon Store unless otherwise noted.

Studio Furniture & Design

  • Tables Ikea is a wonderful place, as you all know. The table in front of the window is similar to this one and I really love the shelf at the bottom, plus the table itself is adjustable. The table to the left is from Amazon and is your basic, sturdy, good quality table. I also highly recommend stainless steel tables which can just be heated and wiped when wax drips, plus you don’t have to spend extra money on silicone sheets to cover the tabletop.
  • Lighting Home Depot fluorescent strips and track lighting. This is more than enough lighting, my studio looks like the sun.
  • Electricity If you’re lucky enough to be upgrading your electricity, install 200 amp service on 2 or more separate circuits around the room.
  • Chair Basic tall desk chair if you prefer to sit..make sure it’s adjustable. I prefer a chair without arms because they just get in the way.
  • Mats Better for your back than sitting is to stand at a tall table, but make sure you have good cushioning under your feet. These mats are a great value and your feet and lower back will thank you years from now. My studio assistant kitties love to sharpen their claws on them, so unless you want holes in yours, keep them away from your furry friends.
  • Paint Storage I recommend storing your paints in drawers to keep them dust free-so the dust doesn’t get in your paintings, of course. I wish I could share where to purchase my paint storage cabinet, but I’m not sure where to buy one.. I purchased it used from Craigslist-it’s very old, very heavy and exactly what I needed when I was shopping. Try Facebook Marketplace in addition to Craigslist, I find amazing deals from locals in my neighborhood on there.

Studio Encaustic Equipment

  • Roland Hot Box Use for encaustic monoprints. This is available from Vent a Fume and the link will take you to their very comprehensive information page. I have the double size box and it’s sufficient for many things. I know many people who have the single and wish they had a double size, but you’ll have to make that decision based on the size of work you’re comfortable making. R&F has encaustic monoprint classes and everyone gets a hotbox to try, so maybe you should take a class first to figure out what size you like.
  • Vent a Fume portable ventilation system that can be installed via casement window in basement or through wall. Consult Vent a Fume initially for advice and HVAC to install. If you have a window, these window exhaust fans are an excellent supplement to the VAF. Make sure any fresh air ventilation is in front of you-meaning the fumes are being pulled away from you as you stand at the encaustic work table.
  • Extra Large Pancake Griddle I can’t tell you how many people ask me about my griddle! It’s much larger than your basic pancake griddle and allows much more room for paint mixing.
  • Small Electric Skillet I like to keep my medium separate from my colors so this little 7×7 inch skillet is perfect.
  • Paint Pans I use these disposable mini bread pans for my medium and bulk colors and these cupcake pans for smaller amounts of color-I like that they are extremely economical and I can easily form them into a spout for pouring. Just a note that R&F does not recommend aluminum pans for paints as they can sometimes discolor them. When I taught with Dietlind Vander Schaaf last summer she had these extra large paint pans for medium and I’ve actually started to collect them in my studio as well.
  • Embossing Heat Tool I prefer these tools to larger heat guns-I can turn them on/off with one hand, they’re much lighter and they take up less room. They don’t get as hot as the larger ones, but they work just fine for encaustic purposes.
  • Silicone Sheets I used paper for years to cover my work surface and absolutely hated changing it. Silicone baking sheets are so easy to clean and pay for themselves as they rarely need to be replaced. I have smaller sheets, but now you can get a larger silicone mat here.
  • Irons For collage and small paintings, I use the Clover Mini Iron and the Dritz Petite Press. The Petite Press goes in and out of a favor on Amazon, so if it’s not available there, search it on Google. These are my go-to irons and are also available at Joanne’s, Walmart and Michaels. For larger areas and larger paintings, I use the Hangar 9 Sealing Iron.
  • Hake Brushes Most encaustic painters use these goat’s hair brushes and they are available in a wide range of sizes, quality and prices at Michaels and other art supply stores as well as my Amazon Encaustic Store. I would recommend starting out with .5 inch, 1 inch, 1.5, 2, 2.5. Any larger than that is too big and not necessary. Also good to have around are hogs bristle brushes in those sizes as well as very small sizes. Whatever you purchase, make sure it is a natural hair brush and not a synthetic as these will melt.

NEW! Virtual Encaustic Demonstration: Basically, the Very Basics

Start the New Year off right by doing what you’ve always wanted to do: learn encaustic painting!

Watch the recording from this demonstration HERE.

Basically, the Very Basics Encaustic
A Live Virtual Zoom Workshop
Registrants receive a Zoom link to join the workshop & have access to the recorded session for a limited time following the workshop.

Level: Beginner

When
January 6, 2022
1:00pm-3:30pm EST
*We will take a short break during the session

Price
FREE

To Register
Just send an email with a request to register

Who
For Lorraine’s bio, portfolio, exhibitions, teaching and anything else you might want to know, please visit her web site.

Workshop Description

Start the New Year off right by doing what you’ve always wanted to do: learn encaustic painting! This is an extremely comprehensive LIVE Virtual Demonstration jammed packed with everything you need to know to start painting with this inspiring medium. It’s all here, plus some additional advanced techniques for those who may want a bit more. Also…a LIVE Q&A will immediately follow the demonstration.

***Registration for my Beyond the Basics: Layers, Translucency & Collage Live Virtual Encaustic Workshop automatically enrolls you in this workshop for FREE!

Tips & Techniques covered:

  • A Brief History of Encaustic
  • Safety
  • Basic Tools
  • Work Surfaces
  • Fusing
  • Color Mixing Techniques
  • Paint Application/Layering Techniques
  • Smooth Surface Manipulation
  • Texture Techniques
  • Basic Scraping
  • Adding Line
  • Stencilling/Masks
  • Basic Collage
  • Incising/Mark-making Techniques
  • Clean-up
  • Storage
  • Live Q&A

NEW! Virtual Encaustic Workshop: Beyond the Basics

If you’re ready to take your encaustic painting knowledge to the next level, then this is the workshop for you. Designed for those with some encaustic painting experience, this workshop takes a deeper dive into progressive painting and mixed media encaustic techniques to include color mixing, transparency and opacity, blending and gradations and how to organize layers of color and visual information.

If you could say it with words, there would be no reason to paint. –Edward Hopper

Beyond the Basics Encaustic Painting
A Live Virtual Zoom Workshop
Registrants will receive a Zoom link to join the workshop & will have access to the recorded sessions for a limited time following the workshop.

Limited to 10 participants!
Level: Intermediate to Advanced

When
3 Days-April  5, 7, 12, 2022
1:00pm-3:30pm EST each day
*We will take a short break during the session

Price
$450 Venmo or Check
$466 Paypal

3 Ways to Register
1. *PREFERRED* Venmo: Send to @Lorraine-Glessner
2. Paypal: Send to lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com
3. Check (please contact Lorraine for mailing address)

Who
For Lorraine’s bio, portfolio, exhibitions, teaching and anything else you might want to know, please visit her web site.

Workshop Description

If you’re ready to take your encaustic painting knowledge to the next level, then this is the workshop for you. Designed for those with some encaustic painting experience, this workshop takes a deeper dive into progressive painting and mixed media encaustic techniques to include color mixing, transparency and opacity, blending and gradations and how to organize layers of color and visual information.
Organized into three comprehensive segments with time in between for experimenting with the techniques at your leisure, this workshop is designed to offer you the group workshop experience without leaving home. Segment one is focused on encaustic color mixing, translucency, opacity, alternative application techniques and tools. Segment two is an even deeper dive into encaustic painting techniques, layering, blending, gradations and comprehensive scraping and layer manipulation techniques. The third segment is a deep dive into encaustic collage, including seamless placement, application and fusing, image transfer, mixed media and composition.
It is helpful, but not necessary to have had any previous experience with the encaustic medium to take this workshop.

***Registration for this workshop automatically enrolls you in Basically the Very Basics Live Virtual Encaustic Demonstration for FREE!

Who should take this workshop?

  • You’ve worked in encaustic for a while and have never used its transparency and layering possibilities to full advantage.
  • You’ve worked in encaustic for a while and have never scraped your layers(!) to reveal the awesomeness underneath.
  • You want to express yourself in a more meaningful way with your work.
  • You want to create consistency, a personal voice, your own mark, in your paintings and body of work as a whole.
  • Your creative process is stagnating and you need to learn a new process, idea or technique.
  • You love image and collage, but when you embed these elements into encaustic, the collage is blurred, burned or looks clunky.
  • You love painting with the intensely pigmented color of encaustic and want to learn how to effectively apply it-how to mix color, how and when to use glazes, what brushes and tools to use.
  • You are frustrated with your current body of work, your process(es) and want to create consistency, and a cohesive portfolio.
  • You are a semi-beginner to advanced painter (encaustic or other) who often finds their paintings rife with color, paint, collaged, etc. information, but can’t put a finger on what is lacking or how to finish it.
  • You have great ideas but your compositions are scattered, nothing connects or works together to tell your story.


What happens in this workshop? What will I learn?

  • Learn tips for getting out of your own way so your painting process flows.
  • Learn how to apply encaustic paint in layers and in various levels of transparency, as well as how and when to scrape back to reveal exciting forms and patterns within the layers.
  • Learn how to use the transparency of the wax to allow pattern and information to combine and ‘talk’ within the painting.
  • How to effectively use the palette for mixing and painting in encaustic.
  • Learn alternatives to the tools, painting and scraping methods from the ‘usual’ encaustic techniques.


    Included in all of my encaustic workshops
  • Color, composition, application, content-the basics, the intermediate, the advanced.
  • Using color relationships, proportion, scale as an effective foundation for other painterly information.
  • Learn how to use encaustic’s strengths (layering, transparency, luminosity) to tell your story.
  • Group sharing and discussion-always an amazingly helpful time for participants to share their victories and struggles.
  • A slide talk with examples of contemporary artists whose work applies the concepts discussed in the workshop is offered for inspiration. Some examples of the slides included in the talks for this workshop is just below.
  • Individual and group instruction/critique throughout the workshop.


    SUGGESTED MATERIALS PARTICIPANTS HAVE IN THEIR STUDIO
    • Read this blog post for tools ideas-please note, you don’t have to have these materials but you might see something you’d like to try.
    • 2-4 wooden painting panels (your preference of 8×8 or 10×10, but no larger or smaller, please) (nothing coated in acrylic or acrylic gesso!!)
    • 3-5 natural hair brushes  for encaustic painting (1 smallish-no bigger than 1.5” brush will be designated your medium brush, so it must be free of color.
    • 1lb encaustic medium from any company
    • Heat gun and/or Iwatani torch
    • Sketchbook or Drawing paper
    • Package of razor blades or clay scraper
    • Any small sharp-ended tool for incising/writing/drawing into the wax (sewing or knitting needles are great)
    • Basic encaustic colors

      OPTIONAL MATERIALS 
    • Double sided scraper tool-available for purchase here
    • Mark-making tools…Woody, litho crayon, graphite paper, charcoal, oil pastel, etc.
    • Decorative stencils, mesh, doilies, etc-anything flat with open areas that can be used as a stencil
    • Various materials for collage (papers, magazine images, photos, etc.)

What kind of work will I make?

Please enjoy these works in progress that were created by workshop participants during workshops similar to this one.

Workshops, Workshops, Workshops… My 2022 Encaustic Workshop & Retreat Schedule

My 2022 Virtual & In-Person Encaustic Workshop & Retreat Schedule

2022 VIRTUAL ENCAUSTIC WORKSHOPS

BASICALLY THE VERY BASICS ENCAUSTIC
Live Zoom Demonstration
January 6, 2022, 1:00-3:30PM EST
WORKSHOP WEBSITE & REGISTRATION


BEYOND THE BASICS ENCAUSTIC: LAYERS, TRANSLUCENCY & COLLAGE
Live Zoom Workshop
April 5, 7, 12, 2022 1:00-3:30PM EST
WORKSHOP WEBSITE & REGISTRATION


PAINTING WITH FIRE ONLINE ENCAUSTIC WORKSHOPS WITH ESSENCE OF MULRANNY
26 Instructors/52 Lessons for One Low Price of $249
ITS NOT TOO LATE TO SIGN UP AND YOU’LL HAVE FOREVER ACCESS TO THE VIDEOS!
CLICK HERE TO REGISTER
2022 IN-PERSON WORKSHOP & RETREAT SCHEDULE


MIXED MEDIA ENCAUSTIC: FIBER & STRUCTURE
May 27-29
Schweinfurth Art Center, Auburn, NY
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


ALTERNATIVE METHODS & MATERIALS ENCAUSTIC: EXPLORING LINE
15th International Encaustic Conference
June 6-7
Truro Center for Arts at Castle Hill, Truro, MA
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


EXPLORING LANDSCAPE IN ENCAUSTIC & THE MARK: A VERMONT ARTIST RETREAT W/DIETLIND VANDER SCHAAF
So thankful to RF PAINTS for donating their exceptional products to this workshop!!
June 20-24
Lareau Inn & Farm, Waitsfield, Vermont
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


EXPLORING LANDSCAPE THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY, THE FIGURE & ENCAUSTIC: A VERMONT ARTIST RETREAT W/LEAH MACDONALD
So thankful to RF PAINTS for donating their exceptional products to this workshop!!
Equally thankful to HAHNEMUHLE PAPERS for partially sponsoring this retreat!!!
July 11-15
Lareau Inn & Farm, Waitsfield, Vermont
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


FINDING YOUR CREATIVE TRUTH: A WORKSHOP COLLABORATION WITH TERRI YACOVELLI
July 25-28
Railroad house Inn, Marietta, Pennsylvania
WORKSHOP WEBSITE COMING SOON!


ABSTRACTING THE LANDSCAPE EN PLEIN AIR WITH ENCAUSTIC: A VERMONT ARTIST RETREAT W/KELLY MILUKAS
So thankful to RF PAINTS for donating their exceptional products to this workshop!!
August 15-19
Lareau Inn & Farm, Waitsfield, Vermont
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


MIXED MEDIA ENCAUSTIC: LAYERS & TRANSLUCENCY
October 21-23
The Encaustic Center, Richardson, Texas
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


ABSTRACT MIXED MEDIA ENCAUSTIC
November 11-13
Fountainhead Art Space, Atlanta, Georgia
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION

Abstracting the Landscape En Plein-Air with Encaustic: A Vermont Artist Retreat

Using Vermont’s ever-changing light and stunningly diverse landscape as muse, this retreat experience is designed for artists interested in transitioning to an abstract encaustic painting style while also developing a unique creative voice.

Treat nature by the sphere, the cylinder and the cone…
Sometimes I imagine colors as if they were living ideas, being of pure reason with which to communicate. Nature is not on the surface, it is deep down.
~Paul Cezanne

Image: Kelly Milukas

What Abstracting the Landscape En Plein-Air with Encaustic: A Vermont Artist Retreat

When August 15-19, 2022

Monday 7-9pm Orientation
Tuesday-Friday, 9am-4:00pm Workshop Hours
Tuesday-Thursday, 6:00-9pm optional night studio hours

(Scroll down for detailed daily itinerary)

Where  Lareau Farm Inn, Waitsfield, Vermont

Limited to 12 participants!
Level: Intermediate to Advanced
$1800 includes accommodations** (See the list of available rooms below), breakfast and lunch and most workshop materials (see supply list below)

Not Interested in Lareau Inn Accommodations, breakfast or lunch?
$1000 includes workshop fee and most materials (see supply list below)

Registration Instructions if staying at Lareau Inn:
1. Visit the Lareau Inn web site and choose your room. See the list below of available rooms. DO NOT book the room from the Lareau Inn web site!!!
2. Contact Lorraine via email lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com with the name of the room you’d like to book and for payment details.

Available Rooms at the Inn as of February 7, 2022

Forgiveness

Additional Accommodations are available at Waitsfield Inn and Featherbed Inn which are within one mile of Lareau Inn.
**Please Note Although the workshop continues through Friday, you must check out of Lareau Inn on Friday morning. If you would like to stay in the area Friday evening or beyond, there are many places in the town of Waitsfield and in nearby Stowe.

Payment Payment of 50% of the workshop fee + materials + accommodations ($900 if paying via check or Venmo, $932 if paying via Paypal) is due at the time of registration with the remaining 50% ($900) due approximately 6 weeks before the workshop date. Please contact Lorraine for payment details.

For Registration, Please Contact: Lorraine Glessner, lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com

Who A collaborative teaching venture with Kelly Milukas &
Lorraine Glessner (Scroll down for more about Lorraine and Leah)

Workshop Description
Using Vermont’s ever-changing light and stunningly diverse landscape as muse, this retreat experience is designed for artists interested in transitioning to an abstract encaustic painting style while also developing a unique creative voice. Traditional en plein air image gathering techniques are combined with guided studies exploring new ways of seeing and simplifying color, value, texture and form. Outdoor studies are then translated into encaustic paintings using comprehensive translucency, layering and color mixing techniques, which may be combined with collage and/or mixed media to make the abstract landscape your own. Considerations of our body’s connection and its direct relationship to landscape will also be discussed through journaling, readings and expressive mark-making exercises. Optional individual critiques with both instructors will be offered to all participants.

**Please note that participants should be prepared to spend time outside as well as in the studio. Any participant unable to take part in the outdoor activities are welcome to opt out and alternative indoor creative exercises will be provided.

Detailed Workshop Itinerary

Monday 7-9pm Orientation
Meet & Greet Wine and Smores by the Lareau Farm Fire Pit

Tuesday 9-4:00 Workshop, 6:00-9:00pm Optional Night Studio
We will start the day en plein air, learning how to select a composition, rough out the values, identify and combine forms within the landscape. Back at the studio a comprehensive discussion and demos of encaustic color mixing, color to value color matching, translucency and layering is the main focus for the afternoon. Lorraine will introduce a series of fun encaustic painting exercises designed to sharpen your encaustic color, application and layering expertise. Kelly and Lorraine will begin conducting personalized individual mentoring sessions.

Wednesday 9-4:00 Workshop, 6:00-9:00pm Optional Night Studio
A deeper dive into the plein air image gathering experience to include a more complex visual area, a focus on texture as well as further exploration of synthesizing form, value and layering color to capture mood. Continued color and value matching to amplify or mute your abstract compositions.
Later, Lorraine and Kelly will introduce encaustic collage, texture, surface manipulation and mark-making exercises, encouraging students to think creatively, symbolically and intuitively throughout the creative process. Kelly and Lorraine will continue conducting personalized individual mentoring sessions.

Thursday 9-4:00 Workshop, 6:00-9:00pm Optional Night Studio
After morning discussion, we will continue with uninterrupted work time to further explore abstracting the landscape using encaustic collage, surface manipulation, translucency, layers and mark-making to build a series that expresses your personal connection to the landscape.
Take the rest of the afternoon to experiment with marks, make color studies, ask questions, request informal demos, and continue with individual discussions with Kelly and Lorraine.

Friday 9:00am-1:00pm Workshop
Morning work time to complete projects, look at books, journal your thoughts and continued individual mentoring with Lorraine and Kelly. Late morning project show and tell with the group, lunch, clean up and good-byes.

What Else?

  • Color relationships, composition, application, content, proportion, scale as an effective foundation for other painterly information.
  • Learn how to use encaustic’s strengths (layering, transparency, luminosity) to tell your story.
  • Mark-making exercises geared toward making simple or complex marks to generate a personal language.
  • The option of an Individual Consultation/Critique discussion with each instructor. Bring a piece of work, a question, a concern, a problem and discuss it with Kelly and Lorraine.
  • Some guided meditation time and planned hikes will relax and open your mind and spirit to the land, helping to support and nurture your unique creative voice.
  • A slide talk with examples of contemporary artists whose work applies the ideas and concepts discussed in the workshop is offered for inspiration.
  • Lots of open studio time to explore and interpret the inspiration gained from the meditations and hikes.

SCROLL DOWN TO THE END OF THIS POST TO SEE Images of student work and fun scenes from encaustic retreats at Lareau Farm Inn in 2021, student work and images from other workshops taught by Kelly and Lorraine.
For more images of past Artist Retreats co-taught by Lorraine visit here, here and here. Additional blog posts related to artist retreats co-taught by Lorraine are here, here and here..

For Registration, Please Contact: Lorraine Glessner, lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com

About Lareau Farm Inn & Barn
Nestled on 25 acres of natural beauty, with the Mad River just steps away as well as trails for walking, hiking, mountain biking, Lareau Farm Inn and Barn is the perfect place to spark and inspire your artist vision. Our workshop studio is in the Historic Dairy Barn on the Lareau property, featuring rough-hewn beams, centuries-old hardwood floors and tons of space in which to create. The rooms at Lareau Inn feature antique furnishings, comfortable beds, and charming baths in a Vermont farmhouse setting with delicious farm to table dining. There is plenty of room to relax and enjoy the view in the common areas including a charming dining room, back porch and backyard fire pit. Visit Lareau Farm Inn Web Site for more images and information.


About Kelly Milukas

http://kellymilukas.com
Instagram @kellymilukas
Kelly Milukas, professional working and teaching artist, art & science residency collaborator, is an award-winning multi-media artist whose practice began as a sculptor and has expanded her art making include pastel and encaustic painting. Big, bold, brave color, shape and texture, define her broad and diverse subject matter. Her “Keys to Cures” have been exhibited in many venues including the International Encaustic Museum, Sante Fe, NM, her solo exhibitions at the Ronald Reagan International Forum, in Washington, DC, the
Museum at Palm Beach Photographic Centre, FL, and the Regenerative Medicine Forum in Berkeley, CA. Her artwork is in national museums, international private and corporate collections, and been visible at international art fairs such as Red Dot Miami, and Boston International Art Fairs. She has served as a curator and juror, and her ability to communicate her ideas has established her as a respected and sought-after instructor and speaker in museums, arts and science forums, universities, and arts organizations. She is a juried artist member of the Salmagundi Club, the founding President Emerita and member of the South Coast Artists, RI & MA, and a past President of the Providence Art Club, the 3 rd oldest art club in the
United States founded in 1880.

About Lorraine Glessner


lorraineglessner.net
Instagram @lorraineglessner1
Lorraine Glessner’s love of surface, pattern, markmaking, image and landscape has led her to combine disparate materials and processes such as silk, wood, wax, pyrography, rust, paper and more in her work. Lorraine is a former Assistant Professor at Tyler School of Art, Temple University, a workshop instructor and an award-winning artist. She holds an MFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University, a BS from Philadelphia University, and an AAS in Computer Graphics from Moore College of Art & Design. She has a diverse art background with skills that include painting, sculpture, graphic design, interior design, textile design, photography, digital imaging and much more. Among her most recent professional achievements is a Second Place award in Sculpture from Art of the State at the State Museum in Harrisburg, PA, a recently completed artist residency at Jentel Foundation and an acquisition by Kelsey-Seybold Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. Lorraine’s work is included in the recently released Encaustic Art in the 21st Century by Ashley Rooney and Nuance, a curated book by artist, Michelle Stuart. Lorraine frequently lectures and participates on academic panels at various Conferences including The International Encaustic Conference, SECAC and The College Art Association Annual Conference. Her work is exhibited locally and nationally in galleries, museums, craft centers, schools, libraries, universities, and more. Like her work, Lorraine brings to her teaching a strong interdisciplinary approach, mixed with a balance of concept, process, history, experimentation, problem solving and discovery.

Workshop Supplies & Materials

Materials Included: The following list of materials is provided for the student

  • All encaustic paints, encaustic medium, tools and equipment
  • a variety of pigment sticks
  • Sumi ink & other misc. drawing media
  • Misc. drawing papers
  • Paper towels/rags
  • Extra encaustic brushes
  • Stencils and other textures
  • Misc. collage materials
  • Extra rice/printing papers for encaustic monoprint

What to bring: the following is a list of materials for the student to bring to the workshop (Visit Lorraine’s Amazon Store for Art Supply/Portable Art Supply Ideas)

  • Sketchbook/notebook, pencil or pen for note taking (you need this sketchbook only in the case that like your notes separate from your sketches)
  • Portable watercolor sketchbook (lay flat size 9 x 12, mixed media or watercolor sketchbook, heavy stock to withstand wet media, encaustic sketching and color matching, Strathmore 300 Mixed Media (117 lb) is an excellent choice)
  • 1-2 drawing media of your choice (pencil, pastel, conte charcoal, oil pastel, Crayon, graphite, Sharpie felt pen, etc.)
  • Tombow 56171 Dual Brush Pen Art Markers, Grayscale, 10-Pack. Blendable, Brush and Fine Tip Markers
  • Portable gouache or watercolor drawing media of your choice for plein air (make sure you have black watercolor and/or black and white gouache)
  • Color Wheel The Artist’s View Catcher
  • Water brush (1/2 to 1 inch flats to paint simple shapes)
  • Low tack masking tape
  • Absorbent papers for encaustic monoprinting (rice, masa, other printing papers)
  • Closed toe shoes for safety in the studio
  • 4-6 wooden painting panels (your preference of 8×8 or 10×10, but no larger or smaller, please) Other suggested substrates are: masonite (coated with encaustic gesso), Ampersand Encausticbord, MultiMedia Art Board. If you decide to bring something other than what is suggested here, it must be rigid and not coated in acrylic or acrylic gesso!!
  • 2-4 actual OR images of your work, digital prints or phone/iPad sharing is fine
  • 5-7 hake or hog’s bristle natural hair brushes in 1-2 inch sizes for encaustic painting (1 brush will be designated your medium brush, so it must be free of color if you are bringing used brushes)
  • materials for collage (fabric, papers, magazine images, photos, etc.)
  • Optional Materials Smock, any encaustic paint color or pigment stick color you favor, Iwatani torch with extra butane, any tool or material for any technique that you normally employ while working with encaustic, textured objects and/or sharp ended tool for pressing into/incising/writing/drawing into wax, flat edge catalyst wedge for mixing color palettes, 1-2 inspiring books to share with the class.

Hiking Equipment Recommendations

  • Sturdy hiking shoes/boots
  • Small waterproof cushion or portable chair
  • Butt pack or small backpack
  • Comfortable clothing
  • Light rainwear
  • Hat
  • Water bottle
  • For art supply/portable art supply/hiking or travel ideas, visit Lorraine’s Amazon Store

Cancellation
Please note a $50 cancelation processing fee will be deducted from any refund.
In the event that you need to cancel your workshop, please notify Lorraine via email.
Cancelations made 30 days or more from the workshop start date will be refunded their deposit (minus $100 processing fee).
Cancelations made 30 days or less from the workshop start date will be refunded their deposit (minus $100 processing fee) only if the space can be filled. If the space cannot be filled, no refund will be issued.

For Registration, Please Contact: Lorraine Glessner, lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com

Workshop Image Gallery
Images of student work and fun scenes from encaustic retreats at Lareau Farm Inn in 2021, student work and images from other workshops taught by Kelly and Lorraine.
For more images of past Artist Retreats co-taught by Lorraine visit here, here and here. Additional blog posts related to artist retreats co-taught by Lorraine are here, here and here..

Image Credit: Kelly Milukas & Lorraine Glessner

Exploring Landscape Through Photography, The Figure & Encaustic: An Artist Retreat

Explore the photographic possibilities of a live model within the rugged natural beauty of Vermont. Along with daily journaling, meditation, readings and expressive mark-making exercises, hikes and photo shoots will provide the inspiration for which to develop ideas and provide areas of focus for series based work while also developing your personal artistic voice.

I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I,
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

-Robert Frost
Image: Leah MacDonald

So grateful to Hahnemuhle Papers for partially sponsoring this workshop!

So grateful to R&F Paints for partially sponsoring this workshop!!!

What
Exploring Landscape Through Photography, The Figure & Encaustic: An Artist Retreat

When July 11-15, 2022
(Scroll down for detailed daily itinerary)
Monday 7-9pm Orientation
Tuesday-Friday, 9am-4:00pm Workshop Hours
Tuesday-Thursday, 6:00-9pm optional night studio hours

Where  Lareau Farm Inn, Waitsfield, Vermont

Limited to 12 participants!
Level: Intermediate to Advanced
$1800 includes accommodations** (See the list of available rooms below), breakfast and lunch and most workshop materials (see supply list below)

Not Interested in Lareau Inn Accommodations, breakfast or lunch?
$1000 includes workshop fee and most materials (see supply list below)

Registration Instructions if staying at Lareau Inn:
1. Visit the Lareau Inn web site and choose your room. See the list below of available rooms. DO NOT book the room from the Lareau Inn web site!!!
2. Contact Lorraine via email lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com with the name of the room you’d like to book and for payment details.

Available Rooms at the Inn as of April, 2022
Respect
Forgiveness
Patience

Additional Accommodations are available at Waitsfield Inn and Featherbed Inn which are within one mile of Lareau Inn.
**Please Note Although the workshop continues through Friday, you must check out of Lareau Inn on Friday morning. If you would like to stay in the area Friday evening or beyond, there are many places in the town of Waitsfield and in nearby Stowe.

Payment Payment of 50% of the workshop fee + materials + accommodations ($900 if paying via check or Venmo, $932 if paying via Paypal) is due at the time of registration with the remaining 50% ($900) due approximately 6 weeks before the workshop date. Please contact Lorraine for payment details.

For Registration, Please Contact: Lorraine Glessner, lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com

Who A collaborative teaching venture with Leah MacDonald &
Lorraine Glessner (Scroll down for more about Lorraine and Leah)

Workshop Description
The mark of nature combined with encaustic painting creates timeless works which reference memory, change and time. Utilizing the natural luminosity, textural and layering possibilities of encaustic, participants will experiment with photographic imagery, collage and marks to depict the spirit and essence of the land. Easy to moderate hike(s) exploring the rugged natural beauty of Vermont are led by Lorraine and Leah, during which students will explore the photographic possibilities of a live model within a landscape environment. Along with daily journaling, meditation, readings and expressive mark-making exercises, these immersive hikes and photo shoots will provide the inspiration for which to develop ideas and provide areas of focus for series based work while also developing your personal artistic voice. Considerations of our body’s connection and it’s direct relationship to landscape will also be discussed. Optional individual critiques with both instructors will be offered to all participants.

Detailed Workshop Itinerary

Monday 7-9pm Orientation
Meet & Greet Wine and Smores by the Lareau Farm Fire Pit

Tuesday 9-4:00 Workshop, 6:00-9:00pm Optional Night Studio
The first day of the workshop will be a two-part photo shoot — students will photograph a model in the studio (our “main character”) and then we will go out on an easy hike to photograph on location in the landscape environment. Leah will teach you techniques and tips for working with a model, arranging props, and creating interesting compositions. Students will review their images and have a personalized editing session with Leah and Lorraine to discuss ideas for a visual narrative and select images that will work best in a composition.

Wednesday 9-4:00 Workshop, 6:00-9:00pm Optional Night Studio
Leah will discuss and give students tips on the best types of ink jet papers for printing photographs on your home printer. 
Lorraine and Leah will introduce photo transfer, collage, texture, surface manipulation and mark-making exercises, encouraging students to think creatively, symbolically and intuitively throughout the creative process.

Thursday 9-4:00 Workshop, 6:00-9:00pm Optional Night Studio
Lorraine and Leah will continue with photo transfer, collage, texture, surface manipulation and mark-making demos and exercises, encouraging students to develop a personal artistic voice. Leah and Lorraine will be conducting personalized individual mentoring sessions.

Friday 9:00am-1:00pm Workshop
Morning work time to complete projects and individual mentoring with Lorraine and Leah, project show and tell with the group, clean up and good-byes.

What Else?

  • Color relationships, composition, application, content, proportion, scale as an effective foundation for other painterly information.
  • Learn how to use encaustic’s strengths (layering, transparency, luminosity) to tell your story.
  • Mark-making exercises geared toward making simple or complex marks to generate a personal language.
  • The option of an Individual Consultation/Critique discussion with each instructor. Bring a piece of work, a question, a concern, a problem and discuss it with Leah and Lorraine.
  • Some guided meditation time and planned hikes will relax and open your mind and spirit to the land, helping to support and nurture your unique creative voice.
  • A slide talk with examples of contemporary artists whose work applies the ideas and concepts discussed in the workshop is offered for inspiration.
  • Lots of open studio time to explore and interpret the inspiration gained from the meditations and hikes.

SCROLL DOWN TO THE END OF THIS POST TO SEE Images of student work and fun scenes from this encaustic retreat at Lareau Inn in 2021. 
For more images of past Artist Retreats co-taught by Lorraine visit here, here and here. Additional blog posts related to artist retreats co-taught by Lorraine are here, here and here..

For Registration, Please Contact: Lorraine Glessner, lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com

About Lareau Farm Inn & Barn
Nestled on 25 acres of natural beauty, with the Mad River just steps away as well as trails for walking, hiking, mountain biking, Lareau Farm Inn and Barn is the perfect place to spark and inspire your artist vision. Our workshop studio is in the Historic Dairy Barn on the Lareau property, featuring rough-hewn beams, centuries-old hardwood floors and tons of space in which to create. The rooms at Lareau Inn feature antique furnishings, comfortable beds, and charming baths in a Vermont farmhouse setting with delicious farm to table dining. There is plenty of room to relax and enjoy the view in the common areas including a charming dining room, back porch and backyard fire pit. Visit Lareau Farm Inn Web Site for more images and information.

About Leah and Lorraine

About Leah MacDonald
https://www.lostlightluv.com/
Instagram @Leahwax1
My work is a dialogue between my imagination, my curiosity, my imperfections and my desires. I express the tales of womanhood, sharing stories through form, color and texture.
I am a portrait artist. I primarily photograph women and embellish the photographs with layers of beeswax, colored wax, painting and drawing. Adding wax for texture and color for mood changes the black and white photographs. Wax embellishes and veils my subjects and I draw to decorate and control the image. The ability to layer mediums and constantly change appearance and texture allows me to stray from reality and reach the playground of imagination. I am interested in images from nature and designs that have floral and intricate forms.
I have enjoyed a varied career path within the arts. I shoot digital commercial photography and I owned a small company that designed handmade art books and wedding albums. I taught photography for 7 years at the Art Institute of Philadelphia. I am currently the Education Curriculum Director at the Manayunk-Roxborough Art Center. In 2017 I was selected as the recipient of the NewCourtland Fellowship by The Center for Emerging Visual Artists. Now, over twenty years into my career as an artist and art educator, I have taught and exhibited all over the world — from being invited to do a live encaustic painting demonstration on the Martha Stewart show to working in the theater as the scenic director of In My Body: The Musical.
My passion is sharing my art and creativity with others. I have taught workshops as large as thirty-five students and as small as one-on-one private sessions — from private workshop retreats in France to teaching groups of elementary students in my backyard studio. I have grown to appreciate teaching all age groups for their unique needs and perspectives.

About Lorraine Glessner

lorraineglessner.net
Instagram @lorraineglessner1
Lorraine Glessner’s love of surface, pattern, markmaking, image and landscape has led her to combine disparate materials and processes such as silk, wood, wax, pyrography, rust, paper and more in her work. Lorraine is a former Assistant Professor at Tyler School of Art, Temple University, a workshop instructor and an award-winning artist. She holds an MFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University, a BS from Philadelphia University, and an AAS in Computer Graphics from Moore College of Art & Design. She has a diverse art background with skills that include painting, sculpture, graphic design, interior design, textile design, photography, digital imaging and much more. Among her most recent professional achievements is a Second Place award in Sculpture from Art of the State at the State Museum in Harrisburg, PA, a recently completed artist residency at Jentel Foundation and an acquisition by Kelsey-Seybold Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. Lorraine’s work is included in the recently released Encaustic Art in the 21st Century by Ashley Rooney and Nuance, a curated book by artist, Michelle Stuart. Lorraine frequently lectures and participates on academic panels at various Conferences including The International Encaustic Conference, SECAC and The College Art Association Annual Conference. Her work is exhibited locally and nationally in galleries, museums, craft centers, schools, libraries, universities, and more. Like her work, Lorraine brings to her teaching a strong interdisciplinary approach, mixed with a balance of concept, process, history, experimentation, problem solving and discovery.

Workshop Supplies & Materials

Materials Included: The following list of materials is provided for the student

  • All encaustic paints, encaustic medium, tools and equipment
  • a variety of pigment sticks
  • Sumi ink & other misc. drawing media
  • Misc. drawing papers
  • Paper towels/rags
  • Extra encaustic brushes
  • Stencils and other textures
  • Misc. collage materials
  • Hahnemuhle photo papers
  • Printing of images

What to bring: the following is a list of materials for the student to bring to the workshop

  • Sketchbook/notebook, pencil or pen for note taking
  • 1-2 drawing media of your choice (pencil, pastel, conte charcoal, oil pastel, Crayon, graphite, felt pen, etc.)
  • Closed toe shoes for safety in the studio
  • 6-8 wooden painting panels (your preference of 8×8 or 10×10, but no larger or smaller, please) Other suggested substrates are: masonite (coated with encaustic gesso), Ampersand Encausticbord, MultiMedia Art Board. If you decide to bring something other than what is suggested here, it must be rigid and not coated in acrylic or acrylic gesso!!
  • 2-4 actual OR images of your work, digital prints or phone/iPad sharing is fine
  • 5-7 hake or hog’s bristle natural hair brushes in 1-2 inch sizes for encaustic painting (1 brush will be designated your medium brush, so it must be free of color if you are bringing used brushes)
  • materials for collage (fabric, papers, magazine images, photos, etc.)
  • Digital Camera or smart phone or point and shoot camera or DSLR
  • Laptop with photoshop or another photo editing program (There will be a laptop in the studio if you don’t have your own laptop.)
  • Scissors
  • Pva glue
  • Optional Materials Smock, any encaustic paint color or pigment stick color you favor, Iwatani torch with extra butane, any tool or material for any technique that you normally employ while working with encaustic, textured objects and/or sharp ended tool for pressing into/incising/writing/drawing into wax, 1-2 inspiring books to share with the class.

Hiking Equipment Recommendations

  • Sturdy hiking shoes/boots
  • Butt pack or small backpack
  • Comfortable clothing
  • Light rainwear
  • Hat
  • Water bottle
  • Bag for collecting found materials
  • For art supply/portable art supply/hiking or travel ideas, visit Lorraine’s Amazon Store

Cancellation
Please note a $50 cancelation processing fee will be deducted from any refund.
In the event that you need to cancel your workshop, please notify Lorraine via email.
Cancelations made 30 days or more from the workshop start date will be refunded their deposit (minus $100 processing fee).
Cancelations made 30 days or less from the workshop start date will be refunded their deposit (minus $100 processing fee) only if the space can be filled. If the space cannot be filled, no refund will be issued.

For Registration, Please Contact: Lorraine Glessner, lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com

Workshop Image Gallery
Images of student work and fun scenes from this encaustic retreat at Lareau Inn in 2021. Image Credit: Leah MacDonald & Lorraine Glessner

MORE IMAGES Images of student work and fun scenes from artist workshop retreats hosted and taught by Lorraine and workshops taught by Leah. For more images of past Artist Retreats co-taught by Lorraine visit here, here and here and Lorraine’s Workshop Web Site. Additional blog posts related to artist retreats co-taught by Lorraine are here, here and here..

Workshop Highlight: Exploring Landscape Through Encaustic, Mark-Making and the Handmade Book

Join me in July for a unique encaustic workshop opportunity. Located on the shores of Lake Superior just outside beautiful Bayfield, Wisconsin, Wild Rice Retreat creates a space for grounding the mind, body, and spirit through integrative artistic and holistic life experiences. 

When: July 11-15, 2021

Check In: Sunday, July 11th, 2021 | Check Out: Thursday, July 15th, 2021

Tuition + Meals: From $1004 per person
With RicePod Lodging Package: From $2,083 per person
With Nest Lodging Package: From $2,372 per person
With TreeHaus Lodging Package: From $1,671 per person

Visit Wild Rice Retreats for Information, Supply List, Images and Registration

Use discount code GLESSNER2021…HURRY…It expires 4/30

Workshop Description
Utilizing the natural luminosity, textural and layering possibilities of encaustic, participants will experiment with innovative materials, drawing and marks to depict the spirit and essence of the land. Daily journaling, meditation, readings and expressive mark-making exercises along with leisurely walks exploring the outdoors provide the inspiration for which to develop ideas for series-based work while also developing your personal artistic voice. Participants will experiment with a wide variety of innovative processes and materials such as encaustic monoprinting, suminagashi, powdered graphite/charcoal, graphite bars, horsehair, pyrography and stitch. The conceptual use of translucency and layers is further explored through simple, yet versatile, book bindings to create unique personal journals through the alternative book form. Through listening, mapping, touching, collecting and communing with nature through all of the senses, our body’s connection and its direct relationship to landscape is explored and experienced. Optional individual critiques with Lorraine will be offered to all participants.

**Please note that participants should be prepared to spend time outside as well as in the studio. In the event that participants are unable to take part in the outdoor activities, participants are welcome to opt out and alternative indoor creative exercises will be provided.

What Else

  • Color relationships, composition, application, content, proportion, scale as an effective foundation for other painterly information.
  • Learn how to use encaustic’s strengths (layering, transparency, luminosity) to tell your story.
  • Encaustic monoprints/works on paper and an option for exploration in combine with cold wax.
  • Mark-making exercises geared toward making simple or complex marks to generate a personal language.
  • The option of an Individual Consultation/Critique discussion with Lorraine. Bring a piece of work, a question, a concern, a problem and discuss it with Lorraine.
  • What’s your work about? Deepening the conversation. Guided writing exercises to help you focus on the meaning of your work and generate content for your artist statement.
  • Some guided meditation time and planned hikes will relax and open your mind and spirit to the land, helping to support and nurture your unique creative voice.
  • A slide talk with examples of contemporary artists whose work applies the ideas and concepts discussed in the workshop is offered for inspiration.
  • Lots of open studio time to explore and interpret the inspiration gained from the meditations and hikes.
  • Basic book structures such as the accordion and pamphlet will be explored as sculptural additions to our journals and sketchbooks.
  • The sketchbook as an art form, in and of itself, will be explored in depth as part of a discussion on combining found, altered, and sewn books into our curated sketchbooks.
  • The art of the book as an investigation of narrative, text and image, tactility and materiality and the book form as an intimate object will be discussed.

Visit Wild Rice Retreats for Information, Supply List, Images and Registration

Use discount code GLESSNER2021…HURRY…It expires 4/30

About Wild Rice Retreats
Located on the shores of Lake Superior just outside beautiful Bayfield, Wisconsin, Wild Rice Retreat creates a space for grounding the mind, body, and spirit through integrative artistic and holistic life experiences.  Our focus is on artistic excellence in teaching and thoughtful, supportive programming for individual growth.  Rooted in the idea of exploring and supporting expression in nature, Wild Rice Retreat offers a home for healing guided, personal and group retreats, meeting space, and events following the pillars of nourishment, expression, and movement.  Wild Rice Retreat is a vibrant, creative, and beautiful destination retreat center in the Upper Midwest.

Carefully crafted and locally sourced meals prepared by renowned Chef Lars Dukowitz (formerly of the Wild Rice Restaurant), daily programming, beautiful trails, and comfortable, exquisitely detailed lodging are all part of the retreat package.  Whether guests choose from a guided retreat, taught by nationally acclaimed instructors, a personal retreat, perfect for quiet rest and relaxation, or a group or corporate retreat where guests come together around a common goal, all the elements of retreat await. See more gorgeous images and read about Wild Rice Retreat’s Brand New Housing.

Visit Wild Rice Retreats for Information, Supply List, Images and Registration

Use discount code GLESSNER2021…HURRY…It expires 4/30

What Kind of Work Will I Make?

The following is a collection of student and instructor’s work from workshops similar in content to this one. Enjoy this eye candy, I hope to see you this summer at Wild Rice Retreats!

Fast & Loose Encaustic Painting Part 1/2: Tools

So you’re a painter and have always wanted to work in encaustic but have been deterred by what seems like a slow moving, laborious process compared to other painting mediums like acrylics and oils. You fill sketchbooks with mixed media acrylic sketches that you love, but you want more depth, more scraping abilities, more texture and more dimension that can only be achieved by painting in encaustic…well, you’ve come to the right place!

Happy New Year, my creative blog reading friends! I hope you have been well and are looking forward to better days ahead, as am I. Let’s start off the new year right by discussing my favorite topic…encaustic painting!

So you’re a painter and have always wanted to work in encaustic but have been deterred by what seems like a slow moving, laborious process compared to other painting mediums like acrylics and oils. You love the fast moving, layering and quick drying abilities of acrylic painting. You fill sketchbooks with mixed media acrylic sketches that you love, but you want more depth, more scraping abilities, more texture and more dimension that can only be achieved by painting in encaustic…well, you’ve come to the right place! During this time of Covid constancy, at the request and with the collaboration from several artists, I had the unique opportunity to investigate faster, looser and more painterly working methods that can somewhat replicate acrylic painting methods-but with the awesomeness of encaustic.

In this article, Part One, I am discussing application tools and in Part Two and possibly Part Three, I will discuss working methods and mark-making tools. In addition to listing the tools, I also list where/how you can purchase or make them. If you’re working in encaustic and have investigated alternatives to traditional painting and/or alternative tools, please leave a comment, I would love to hear from you!

Last, I am offering a live, virtual workshop in April, 2021 on this topic-specific dates to be announced soon. Judging by the interest of this topic and of my virtual workshops, I expect it to fill quickly. If you’re interested in joining this workshop, please contact me and I’ll add you to the list. If you’d like to see what goes on in one of my workshops, join my new Facebook Group, Full Spectrum: Lorraine Glessner Painting and Workshops Forum.

Alternative Tools for Working in Encaustic

  • Venetian Plaster Tools
    Made of metal with a plastic handle, these tools can be laid safely on the heated palette and hold the heat so as to transfer the paint from palette to substrate without cooling. These tools are somewhat stiff and act as a metal spatula of sorts allowing one to scoop up from the palette at once, various colors of paint creating interesting textures. (See this article on my Encaustic PaintSmash technique and my IGTV and YouTube Channel videos demonstrating this technique) See my All Things Encaustic Store to purchase.
  • Dripping
    We all know how to do this and likely have done it by accident. Mistake or not, drips can be super cool as a single entity, layered or accumulated. You can drip with a brush by loading it up with paint and throwing it on your substrate or flicking it off your brush with your finger for a splatter effect. For more deliberately placed drips that can be layered and accrued in a 3D effect, try this cool metal eyedropper tool available at on my All Things Encaustic Store.
  • Pouring
    Fun and freeing, this is quick way to add a lot of paint to your substrate at once. Pours dry slowly and smoothly and the drying process can be manipulated for some cool dimensional effects. You can use any kind of cup that will hold liquid encaustic paint…I use these inexpensive aluminum cups which can be bent into a ‘V’ like a pitcher, so I have more control over my pour. You can also create interesting swirled effects by pouring two colors together at the same time or try introducing another color into an existing pour during the drying process. See Pat Gerkin’s wonderful recent experiments with encaustic pours.
  • Tjanting Tools
    Those in the Fiber and Textile tools world are well acquainted with Tjanting Tools. Their use in that world is to apply paraffin wax to cloth as part of the batik process. These tools are made of brass or copper, which holds the heat and keeps the wax liquid, allowing one to make thick or thin lines, the thickness being dependent on the size of the opening of the tool. Designs can be traced, text can be written, areas of a design can be filled. Tjanting tools are also really great for making uniform dots, which can be applied in rows, and/or stacked, and/or accrued. I prefer the copper tjanting tools, but make sure you purchase a larger size opening as they tend to clog easily. If you get really into working with a tjanting, invest in an electric tjanting tool, you won’t regret it. For some eye candy, check out artist Elise Wagner’s paintings that begin with encaustic collagraphs, made with an electric tjanting tool.
  • Flashing Tool
    (See my Art Bite Blog Post with instructions on how to make your own alternative tool) Used like a spatula similar to the Venetian Plaster Tools, these home-made tools can be any shape, size or cut. They are much more flexible than the Venetian Plaster Tools, allowing for more textured painterly effects.
  • Catalyst Tools/Silicone Baking Tools
    (Visit my All Things Encaustic Store to purchase) Where do I begin to talk about Catalyst Tools by Princeton Brush Company? First, what makes them great is that they are painting tools, made for any kind of paint, so you can use them for any painting medium. What makes them even greater is that they’re made of silicone which makes them easy to clean and impervious to heat so they can be used for encaustic painting! These tools will hold the heat for a short time and can be used for PaintSmash, but they’re not as effective as the metal based tools listed above. However, if you’re working in encaustic, cold wax, oils and acrylic mediums, these tools can be used across all of those mediums. Catalyst tools can be rather pricey, so if you’re interested in working with alternative tools, try silicone baking tools/cake decorating tools, which are available on Amazon and at any craft store or hobby store…try them out, find your favorites and then graduate to a catalyst tool.
  • Elizabeth Schowachert Tools
    Think of Catalyst Tools on steroids PLUS some and you have somewhat of an idea of what these tools are about. Just like the Catalyst Tools, they are made of silicone, but that’s as far as the similarities go. These tools are art objects in and of themselves-they are hand-crafted by Elizabeth Schowachert, using lovely materials like bamboo, antique wood and sterling silver. Elizabeth is an artist herself so she knows what artists want. When you hold one of these gorgeous tools or brushes in your hand, there is a feeling that you are wielding an indestructible art making weapon and there are no barriers to what you can do. There is a huge variety of brushes and tools in Elizabeth’s silicone tools catalog, but she offers so much more in her entire catalog of brushes and tools. I have a number of Elizabeth’s tools in my studio, the Encaustic Monotype Drawing Pens and C Silicone Drawing Tools are my faves.
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