printmaking

WORKSHOP HIGHLIGHT: URBAN TRANSFORMATIONS: AN EXPLORATION OF MATERIALS & PLACE

ONLY A SHORT TIME AND A FEW SPOTS LEFT TO SIGN UP!!

September 29-October 2
@ Jeff Hirst’s Studio in the Bridgeport neighborhood of Chicago
$600 + $65 materials fee
WORKSHOP WEB SITE

Contact: Jeff Hirst, jeff@jeffreyhirst.com

Student work from Tyler School of Art and various encaustic workshops similar in content to this one.

Rebecca Solnit writes, ‘Cities have always offered anonymity, variety and conjunction, qualities best basked in by walking… A city always contains more than inhabitant can know, and a great city always makes the unknown and the possible spurs to the imagination.’ This workshop begins with a walking tour of Chicago’s Bridgeport section and the area around the Bridgeport Art Center, in which participants will mine the streets through listening, mapping, touching and collecting raw and image based materials from which to work. Working with fabric, wood and paper, participants will experiment with innovative materials, drawing and marks to depict the spirit and essence of the urban environment while also developing a personal artistic voice. Layers of screen printing under and on top of encaustic, rust/copper printing, branding and considerations of the use of the grid as a conceptual as well as compositional tool will also be discussed. Optional individual critiques with both instructors will be offered to all participants.

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beauty and the book

lorraineglessner.wordpress.com

I’m in love with books-as objects, as art…as friends. i love looking at them, paging through them, admiring the art of them, the craft on the outside as well as the inside and how the two come together to create a complete story.
i started reading at the age of 3, my sister at age 2 (she always wanted to do what i did ; ) i was an extremely shy and quiet child through my childhood and teenage years and i much preferred curling up in a quiet spot to read to doing anything else and in some ways, i’m still the same. i tried doing the kindle thing on my ipad, but i can’t get into it. holding a book’s weight in my hands, smelling the mixture of ink and paper, appreciating it’s structure, feeling the pages ruffle as i determine how far i am from the next chapter and totally escaping to immerse myself in another time and place within the narrative are just a few reasons why i’ll always have stacks of books lining my walls and why i’ll aways celebrate their physical presence as the well as the presence of their stories in my imagination.

an excerpt from the film, liberal arts

A: I love books. I do in, like, the dorkiest way possible.

J: Oh, me too. It’s a problem.

A: Like, I love trees cause they give us books.

J: super cool of the trees to do that, Right?

1. This ancient collection of 70 tiny books, their lead pages bound with wire, could unlock some of the secrets of the earliest days of Christianity. Academics are divided as to their authenticity but say that if verified, they could prove as pivotal as the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1947. The books were discovered five years ago in a cave in a remote part of Jordan to which Christian refugees are known to have fled after the fall of Jerusalem in 70AD. Important documents from the same period have previously been found there…here.

2. Rosamond Purcell, photographer, from Bookworm, published by Quantuck Lane Press. More about her and her work here.

3. random image from here.

4. Quran folio, surah al-Fatihah, 13th century AH/AD 19th century (Qajar), Iran from here.

5. sara mitchell handmade book experiments, here.

6. Rare books were once kept chained to bookshelves to prevent theft from here.

7. Jacqueline Rush Lee, artist, here.

8. Spaniel Binder The Book of Common Prayer Oxford 1700, here.

9. an abandoned library in russia, here.

10. matej kren, huge structure made of thousands of books, more here.