photography

Torrey Layers

As I wrote in my last post, the workshop I taught in Torrey, Utah with artist friend, Jeff Juhlin and the subsequent hikes through Capital Reef and Arches National Parks, was most inspiring. The land, colors, forms, lines, just everything, inspired me. Part 1 of my Torrey posts focuses on the the amazing texture and sculptural forms within the landscape and I’ve devoted this post, Part 2, to layers, color and marks.

My foundation as an artist lies in textiles, specifically in quilting, which ultimately led me to explorations in encaustic. Building up the layers of colored wax, fusing them with heat and scraping them back to reveal amazing things will always keep me working in the medium. To me, layers of wax and other materials represent skin, cells, earth’s geology and its atmosphere, while layering itself relates to memory, perception and time. I see layers in everything and what better place to view earth’s layers than in Torrey, a place that changes daily, but so slowly and gradually, it seemingly never changes at all. In this amazing place and similar to the the process of encaustic, earth’s layers are built up and through the slow processes of water and wind erosion, those layers are revealed and transformed.

The surfaces of most rock faces in Torrey are covered in spectacular colors ranging from subtle pinks, yellows and whites to the deepest sepias, siennas and umbers. These painterly surfaces are known as ‘desert varnish’, a staining that occurs over time through an extremely slow combination process of water and time. Other surface marks, textures and swirls are also visible on the rock’s surface, manifesting a ghost of the water that created it.

Just as stunning as the desert varnish are the colorful, textured markings of lichen, covering the more protected, hidden rock surfaces. Most striking are the color contrasts arising between the greens, yellows and blues of the lichen and contrasting red earth or black lava rocks. Because lichen in the high desert grows abundantly on porous surfaces protected from strong wind and sunlight, it is often overlooked and/or quickly dismissed. However, those who look closely are rewarded with brilliant color, extraordinary patterns and unexpected plant-like formations.

In addition to my own photographs, I have included other artists whose work references layers and marks similar to the surfaces I encountered on my hikes. See more artists like these on my Fiber Pinterest board here and my Drawing and Marks Pinterest board here. Names and web site links to the artist’s included below are in order as follows: Bill Gingles, Deborah Kapoor, Dorothy Caldwell, Erin Endicott, Fran Skiles, Jeane Meyers, Jennifer Reifsneider, Jeri Ledbetter, Junko Oki, Lee Kaloidis, Matthew Harris, Sue Hotchkis, Ward Shumaker, Adam Cohen.

Stay tuned for the next and last post (January, 2017) related to my wondrous trip to Torrey, in which I will share a series of drawings I started during the workshop I taught there and have been working on during my subsequent travels and since I returned home.

If these posts about Torrey, Utah have inspired you, you are in luck because Jeff Juhlin and I will be teaching in Torrey together again in August, 2017. Visit the updated blog post for details about this exciting workshop.

For even more inspiration, view other posts on Layers here and here. See some student work from a workshop I taught on Layers and Texture here and follow my Layers Pinterest board here.

Advertisements

Inspired by…Lovely Lines

From May to August, I taught eight different workshops in eight different states, from big cites to remote locations where I barely got a cell signal. My favorite thing to do at the end of each teaching day is to treat myself to a walk around the town where I’m teaching and I almost always find something to inspire me. I take pictures of anything that attracts me during these walks and then organize them into folders, which I look at later for inspiration. Always attracted to line in everything I see, I put together this small, but strong, collection from my walks.

Workshop Highlight: Exploring Mixed Media Narratives in Photography & Encaustic

I’m so excited to teach this class for the first time at the Kimball Art Center in Park City, Utah!

This workshop combines all of my favorite things: encaustic, photography, landscape and narrative. We will first spend some time photographing the fabulous eclectic town of Park City and lovely surrounding mountain landscape. Then, back at the studio, we will translate these images into narratives using markmaking, collage and encaustic. We will also discuss different types of conceptual vs. journalistic narrative, composition and painting considerations. For the full workshop description and registration details, please visit the workshop web site. To see some of my photographic explorations and narrative encaustic paintings, please follow me on instagram.

There are still a few spots left in this workshop and only a few weeks left to sign up!

Inspired by….Herring Cove, Cape Cod, Part 2

Part 2 of my dune hike inspiration is also focused on Herring Cove Beach where the parking lot is slowly sinking into the sea. I have no idea what happened here, but it was probably the result of protective dunes being washed away by a storm. It was a cloudy day with strong wind and currents, which made the sea look even angrier and the asphalt appear malleable and as black as lava. The contrast of the lead gray sky, dark water, white foam and black asphalt is truly brilliant, not to mention the painted white parking outline and the bright yellow barriers which added a touch of reality to a seriously surreal scene. It’s devastating to look at, but there is true beauty in this vulnerability and in the intense power of nature.

See Part 1 images here.

Inspired by…Herring Cove, Cape Cod, Part 1

Last week I was in gorgeous Provincetown, Cape Cod for the 10th International Encaustic Conference. I had three whole days to kill between the conference festivities and the post conference workshop I was teaching, so I went on a 6 mile hike adventure in the dunes by Herring Cove Beach.

When I hike, I take pictures with my phone of anything that strikes me, usually landscape-y kinds of things. But on this trip, there were two areas that stuck with me that I couldn’t stop photographing.

The first were these little found drawings of rose petals (roses grow wild on Cape Cod) and other natural detritus. As I walked, I was struck by how interestingly balanced were the compositions and materials in these little vignettes and all of them naturally shaped by the wind. All of the images shown here are exactly how I found them, I didn’t change them in any way. They will likely somehow find their way into paintings.

Stay tuned for next week’s post for the second group of images.

 

Inspired by…Layers

Busy in the studio and in the final weeks of the semester teaching at Tyler, but I have some exciting posts coming up soon. In the meantime, enjoy some inspiration pics from my ‘Layered’ board on Pinterest

Inspired by…

Landscapes from random internet searches and Instagram…sometimes expertly photographed, sometimes cheesily Photoshopped, this is what I have been looking at and inspired by…technicolors, strange angles, reflections, textures and surrealistic dream scenes…

cake!

lorraineglessner.wordpress.com

it’s june, the month of weddings and what better time to talk about cakes. the first show i watched on the food channel was ace of cakes. i was totally hooked on this show like one gets hooked on a soap opera, i couldn’t wait for the next episode. what hooked me was the concept of making a cake-an edible object-a work of art and watching the cake go from concept to finished piece to it’s ultimate destruction in the end. the design, engineering and construction of it was amazing to watch as each week the cakes seemed to get more and more complex. unusual forms, painting, sculptural embellishments, color…lots of stuff, the more, the better, in my opinion. since then, i’ve noticed many visual artists exploring the cake form on a conceptual level, so i’ve compiled a little ‘taste’ or ‘bite’, if you will.

1. not just another pretty cake by rosebud cakes…here.

2. i know it’s not cake, but i couldn’t pass up including an edible cotton candy installation by Erno-Erik Raitanen…here.

3. amazing cut paper cake by Tahiti Pehrson…here.

4. fantastical over the top cake by renowned wedding cake artist Cile Bellefleur Burbidge…here.

5. a room-sized cake by scott hove…here.

6. one of my favorite cake makers, artist amy stevens….here.

7. totally decadent work by will cotton…here.

beauty and the book

lorraineglessner.wordpress.com

I’m in love with books-as objects, as art…as friends. i love looking at them, paging through them, admiring the art of them, the craft on the outside as well as the inside and how the two come together to create a complete story.
i started reading at the age of 3, my sister at age 2 (she always wanted to do what i did ; ) i was an extremely shy and quiet child through my childhood and teenage years and i much preferred curling up in a quiet spot to read to doing anything else and in some ways, i’m still the same. i tried doing the kindle thing on my ipad, but i can’t get into it. holding a book’s weight in my hands, smelling the mixture of ink and paper, appreciating it’s structure, feeling the pages ruffle as i determine how far i am from the next chapter and totally escaping to immerse myself in another time and place within the narrative are just a few reasons why i’ll always have stacks of books lining my walls and why i’ll aways celebrate their physical presence as the well as the presence of their stories in my imagination.

an excerpt from the film, liberal arts

A: I love books. I do in, like, the dorkiest way possible.

J: Oh, me too. It’s a problem.

A: Like, I love trees cause they give us books.

J: super cool of the trees to do that, Right?

1. This ancient collection of 70 tiny books, their lead pages bound with wire, could unlock some of the secrets of the earliest days of Christianity. Academics are divided as to their authenticity but say that if verified, they could prove as pivotal as the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1947. The books were discovered five years ago in a cave in a remote part of Jordan to which Christian refugees are known to have fled after the fall of Jerusalem in 70AD. Important documents from the same period have previously been found there…here.

2. Rosamond Purcell, photographer, from Bookworm, published by Quantuck Lane Press. More about her and her work here.

3. random image from here.

4. Quran folio, surah al-Fatihah, 13th century AH/AD 19th century (Qajar), Iran from here.

5. sara mitchell handmade book experiments, here.

6. Rare books were once kept chained to bookshelves to prevent theft from here.

7. Jacqueline Rush Lee, artist, here.

8. Spaniel Binder The Book of Common Prayer Oxford 1700, here.

9. an abandoned library in russia, here.

10. matej kren, huge structure made of thousands of books, more here.

carin ingalsbe

lorraineglessner.wordpress.com

carin ingalsbe writes…

All things have a life and time line. With utilitarian things, the life of an object presents itself through the wear and tear of use. My current interest in photographing vintage clothing began with my desire to capture different aspects of the breakdown of a garment. Like African art, pieces of clothing are meant to be used until they are no longer usable. My desire to capture a moment in the life of a garment before it deteriorates is a way to understand each article of clothing and where it has been.

When I photograph a garment, I find its essence through handling it and working with it over a period of time. Sometimes the soul of the piece is revealed by turning it inside out or backwards.

The ballet presents a unique opportunity. Each garment expresses itself through an invaluable patina that has evolved through the course of incredibly talented dancers using these costumes. The journey that a costume takes is a singular road that cannot be duplicated. Because the costumes are threadbare and torn, they are, by definition, spent. My desire to reveal the value of each piece by rediscovering its pedigree is one that I hope comes through in my work. The evidence of use that each costume has sustained is the very thing that makes it worth considering. 

The attention to detail in the design of these costumes is staggering. Much of the nuance is impossible to see from the perspective of the audience. Perhaps the creators of these costumes intended to pay tribute to the dancers, elevating their experience through an intricately worked garment which beckons them to the role that they are about to perform.

i could look at her work all day…see more here.