design

Two Exciting Upcoming Workshops Demystified

With workshop season fast approaching, I would like to introduce you to two of my most popular workshops. But before I do that, just below is a brief introduction to some of what you will learn in all of my encaustic workshops.

Included in all of my encaustic workshops

  • Color, composition, application, content-the basics, the intermediate, the advanced.
  • Using color relationships, proportion, scale as an effective foundation for other painterly information.
  • Individual consultation/critique discussion with each participant. Bring a piece of work, a question, a concern, a problem and discuss it with me. My most favorite part of the workshop is this special time I spend talking one-on-one with each participant.
  • Learn how to use encaustic’s strengths (layering, transparency, luminosity) to tell your story.
  • Mark-making exercises-whether you are taking the line workshop or not, exercises geared toward making simple or complex marks to generate a personal voice.
  • Book-sharing-each pariticipant brings their favorite art book to share.
  • Group sharing and discussion-always an amazingly helpful time for participants to share their victories and struggles.
  • A slide talk with examples of contemporary artists whose applies the concepts discussed in the workshop is offered for inspiration. Some examples of the slides included in the talks for each of the workshops discussed in this article is just below.
Pattern & Repetition Slides Examples
Grid & Line Slides Examples

ENCAUSTIC PATTERN & REPETITION

Mixed Media Encaustic: Pattern & Repetition
October 4-6
Studio Joy, Kansas City, MO
WORKSHOP WEB SITE

Basic Description
Repeated use of a shape, color or design element unifies composition, creates pattern, rhythm and movement as well as reinforces content. This workshop focuses on the creation of intricate patterns, expressive personal surfaces and complex, multi-layered pieces utilizing and in combination with encaustic painting techniques. With an emphasis on mixed media, methods and materials covered in this workshop include the use of organic and geometric form, realistic and abstract imagery, patterned collage, stencils, candy molds, tjaps, and branding (creating marks with heated metal and wood burning tools). Considerations such as using pattern and repetition as content itself, to tell a story, support and/or strengthen the message will also be discussed.

Who should take this workshop?

  • You swoon over textiles, prints, decorative arts, design, anything with pattern and you want to learn how to effectively incorporate these elements into your work.
  • You already include lots of pattern and repetition in your work, but the work hasn’t moved past mere decoration to involve meaningful content.
  • You desperately want to include pattern in your work, but you are fearful that it will be received by the viewing public as decorative art.
  • You love image and collage, but when you embed these elements into encaustic, the collage is blurred, burned or looks clunky.
  • You love painting with the intensely pigmented color of encaustic and want to learn how to effectively apply it-how to mix color, how and when to dilute, what brushes and tools to use.
  • You are frustrated with your current body of work, your process(es) and want to create consistency, and a cohesive portfolio.
  • You want to express yourself in a more meaningful way with your work.
  • Your creative process is stagnating and you want to learn a new process, idea or technique.
  • You have always wanted to create ‘visual poetry’ in your paintings.

What happens in this workshop? What will I learn?

  • What a motif is and how you can generate one to create personal patterns with meaning and how to incorporate them into your work.
  • Create personally designed fabrics and papers using indigo, rust and compost printing and use them as a basis for a painting.
  • Create repetitive patterns using innovative tools and techniques such as pyrography (making marks with heated metal and tools), tjaps and candy molds.
  • Learn my technique for applying decorative stenciling into my work and how you can use stenciling to strengthen your compositions and content.
  • Learn how to apply encaustic paint in layers and in various levels of transparency, as well as how and when to scrape back to reveal exciting forms and patterns within the layers.
  • Practice the effective application and fusing of encaustic collaged layers so you aren’t tempted to give up collage forever in frustration!
  • Experiment with doodling, mark making and process to create personal patterns.
  • Learn how to use the transparency of the wax to allow pattern and information to combine and ‘talk’ within the painting.
  • Learn how repetitive pattern, symbols, text, ornament adds power and interest to the work and therefore brings the viewer closer to it’s message.
  • How repetition can create visual poetry, rhythm, music, etc within the work.

What kind of work will I make?
Please enjoy the work example pics below from participants who have previously taken this workshop. Please also visit additional blog posts here and here and here for more information related to this workshop.

WHERE CAN I SIGN UP!

Mixed Media Encaustic: Pattern & Repetition
October 4-6
Studio Joy, Kansas City, MO
WORKSHOP WEB SITE

ENCAUSTIC LINE & GRID

Basic Description
Lines lead the eye and communicate information through variation in width, direction, density, length and character. They are as integral to any composition as the composition itself. Despite the incredible versatility of the encaustic medium, there is a limit to the techniques available in which to incorporate line. This workshop explores line and linear language far beyond the usual methods and materials to include the use of tjanting tools, masks, drawing with horse and human hair, branding with heated metal and wood burning tools, as well as creating your own grids, laces and lace like forms using free motion sewing machine embroidery on water soluble stabilizer. The workshop begins with a comprehensive exercise involving composition generation, which will result in several compositions from which to explore these new techniques. Considerations of the use of the grid as a conceptual as well as compositional tool will also be discussed.

Who should take this workshop?

  • You are a semi-beginner to advanced painter (encaustic or other) who often finds their paintings rife with color, paint, collaged, etc. information, but can’t put a finger on what is lacking or how to finish it.
  • You have great ideas but your compositions are scattered, nothing connects or works together to tell your story.
  • You are interested in what the grid can do for your work, but don’t want to make gridded paintings. NOTE: You won’t make a gridded painting in this workshop unless you want to do so, but understanding the concept of the grid as a foundational structure will make your paintings stronger. Guaranteed.
  • You want to express yourself in a more meaningful way with your work.
  • You want to create consistency, a personal voice, your own mark, in your paintings and body of work as a whole.
  • Your creative process is stagnating and you need to learn a new process, idea or technique.
  • You love materials and innovative ways to use them.
  • You dislike drawing and/or you’re afraid of it.

What happens in this workshop? What will I learn?

  • In depth discussion, brainstorming and slide talk about line and the grid-what it means in art, what it does, how to generate it, how to use it.
  • What the concepts of good design are and how to apply these ideas to fine art.
  • Marking, drawing, making marks with fun exercises involving music, text, folding/cutting paper, collage, fire, found materials are sure to relax you so that you don’t even know you’re drawing and are designed for you to generate ideas, content and a personal mark.
  • Effective and productive doodling.
  • Experiment with line ideas using innovative techniques and materials such as horsehair, pyrography (making marks with heated metal and tools), stitching by hand or machine, Solvy (water soluble embroidery stabilizer).
  • Experiment with encaustic tools such as a tjanting, incising into the wax, creating grids and lines using masks, paintsticks and encaustic friendly drawing media.
  • How you can create your own process to make a cohesive body of work and how that process can relate to and enhance content in that work.
  • Learn what found drawings are and how you can use them as a tool for inspiration and content generation.

What kind of work will I make?
Please enjoy the work example pics below from participants who have previously taken this workshop. Please visit additional blog posts here and here and here and here for more information related to this workshop.

WHERE CAN I SIGN UP!

Mixed Media Encaustic: Pattern & Repetition
October 4-6
Studio Joy, Kansas City, MO
WORKSHOP WEB SITE

If you have taken one of these workshops and it has made an impression on your work, I invite you to write briefly about your experience in the comment section and include a pic if you would like. I look forward to hearing from you.

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Inspired By…Fiber & Paint

Painting and fiber, two disciplines whose marriage has always intrigued and inspired me throughout the evolution of my work. Over the 15+ years since graduate school, I have completed several series of work, all of which borrow and combine aspects of both disciplines. However, each series leans either to the fiber or painting end, but never fully captures the essence of either discipline.

For this reason, I am fascinated when I come across artists whose work fully exhibits the perfect balance of material, materiality, color, tactility, surface, pattern and process that encapsulates the two disciplines of fiber and painting. I must mention that there are many artists who work within these boundaries and without listing them-there are so many-I am inspired by them all. However, it was difficult to find artists amongst this group whose work possessed a blending, rather than a combination between the materials, process and techniques used, a seamlessness, a perfect balance, a sensitivity, a symbiosis that is almost intangible and cannot easily be put into words. I have chosen three artists whose work stands out and characterizes these qualities .

I have always been a fan of Margery Amdur’s work and first came across it when she was working with layers of painted, hand cut mylar in wonderful diagrammatic floral patterns that resembled the preparatory acetates and paintings I used to do when I was a textile and rug designer. In her layered paintings, there is a painterly quality in which the materials, process and content effortlessly support one other. Her latest work applying paint, pastel, ink and silkscreen on cosmetic sponges takes painting to a whole new level. Some may categorize these pieces as sculpture, but the use of materials, repetition, tactility, process, technique and structural pattern all speak to textiles. The reference to flowers, the garden, layers and the mark of the hand is also evident.

Julia Bland’s work is what sparked the writing of this post as it imbues the perfect blend of fiber and painting I describe above. Bland’s work is founded in weaving and craft based traditions and her stem from her interest in religious and cultural patterns. Working hand in hand with the repetitive process of weaving, she adds, subtracts, cuts, glues, sews and paints elements into her large scale wall hangings. Hand worked details, knots, stitched and painted areas are added after the weaving takes place making piece exciting and interesting both up close and at a distance.

At first glance, Gabriel Luis Perez’s work may just look like mixed media paintings. However, what I see in these richly layered surfaces are references to quilting, applique, weaving, sewing, embellishment, pattern-making, design and repetitive process all densely integrated with painted pop imagery, text and collaged elements. Of his work he writes, “It is important to me that all my pieces inherit an energy; sometimes that energy is one produced during its performance and at other times it is a conjured from past or future experiences.” They do have an energy and I totally get it.

Team Textile @ The Pentaculum

I happily spent New Year’s Day packing my suitcase and part of my studio, so excited to drive down to Gatlinburg, TN for The 2nd Annual Pentaculum. I was honored to have received the invitation to participate in this exciting event at Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts last year and as the event approached I just couldn’t wait to get there. I have previously taught workshops at Arrowmont and the facilities, food and staff are consistently top notch. The Pentaculum invites artists and writers at various stages in their careers to participate for a one week residency utilizing the studios, collaborating, socializing, etc. The five participating studios during this Pentaculum were Ceramics, 2D Painting, Sign Painting in the wood shop, Jewelry/Metals, Writing and Textiles. The event began with a slide show of all participants’ work, I was so impressed to be among such amazing artists and writers-just simply amazing PEOPLE. To spend a week working around them was an honor.

Of course the textiles studio is where I spent most of my time. Each artist in the studio with me was as individual, accomplished and amazing as their work. Most impressive is how much work each person produced in only one week-this is what uninterrupted time can do for an artist! I am pleased to share their work made during the Pentaculum with you here, please click on their names to visit their web sites for their complete body of work.

Stay tuned for my next blog post describing my personal experience and work created during the Pentaculum.

Loo Bain, who I am privileged to work with at Tyler spent her time repetitiously cutting, drawing 2d and drawing in space with fluorescent vinyl, mylar and other sparkly, shiny fabrics. By the end of the week, her colorful and tactile studies just begged to be touched.

Erin Castellan, our fearless studio coordinator, did a great job herding us cats all week, answering our questions and stitching, stitching, stitching. I have long been a fan of Erin’s work, which translates constructed fabrics of all kinds, thread and other embellishments into stitched paintings. The week of the Pentaculum, she meticulously stitched and beaded an lovely, intimate piece that I secretly covet.

Orly Cogan’s work is instantly recognizable-unabashed, large scale, stitched, collaged, painted pieces exploring feminine myths, identities and relationships. Orly was most at home collaborating with the 2D studio, where they created air brushed magic on her pieces.

Naomi Falk, sculptor & materials wizard, uses performance, clay, fabric, wood, stitch, paper and myriad other materials to investigate personal identities. During the Pentaculum, she experimented with many materials and made all of us in textiles studio amazing hand cut paper crowns!

Sonya Yong James’ work explores repetition, ritual and transcendence through simple felted forms, which become complex through multiples and repetition. During the Pentaculum, Sonya worked to combine felt and horse hair, making quiet, intimate samples-so impressive was her magnificent collection of various colors of horsehair!

Colleen Merrill was extremely prolific during the Pentaculum, especially considering that her constructed pieces are mainly hand sewn. She completed or got a good head start on a new series of soft sculpture pieces entitled ‘fawn’ exploring her new role as a mother.

Valerie Powell’s fun, colorful and approachable work is made with painted, stitched and sculpted shrinky-dinks! Too. Much. Fun. Just as fun was watching a wonderfully detailed, patterned painting take shape, along with some funky sculpted pieces during the week.

Karie Reinertson, owns and operates a multidisciplinary design studio with her partner husband. One of the specialties of the studio are exquisitely hand crafted leather handbags. Karie brought with her some beautiful buttery leather that she cut, braided and sculpted for a new fine art leather piece.

Rebecca Siemering works with paper-found, handmade, stitched, sculpted, constructed. During the Pentaculum, she continued work on her “Lottery Project”, created by stitched and constructed found lottery tickets collected from daily walks in her neighborhood.

Brooks Stevens turns straw into gold with an on-going project entitled ‘Mending Gold: Cloth, Architecture & Landscape’ in which she mends/repairs or simply highlights the essence of the object with stitched gold thread. During the Pentaculum, she methodically stitched a pair of jeans-mesmerizing was her meticulous process.

Melanie Wilder is a weaver who also creates naturally dyed weaving yarns with plants from her own garden. During the Pentaculum she dyed, stitched and labeled a wonderful dye sample book of various plants and mordants on cotton and wool yard and fabrics.

LM Wood collaborates with her computer to create quilts or quilt inspired works that speak to memory, time, history and narratives. Inspired by the photographic image, both found in thrift stores or through searches on her computer, and working with a wide variety of materials, she explores the many forms of narrative the photographic image can provide.

FABRIC PATTERN & IMAGE 1 FALL 2015 FINAL PROJECTS

Final projects from my Fabric Pattern & Image 1 Course in the Fiber & Materials Studies Department at Tyler School of Art, Temple University.

Alternative Materials Fall 2015 Final Projects

Final projects from my Alternative Materials Course in the Fiber & Materials Studies Department at Tyler School of Art, Temple University.

cake!

lorraineglessner.wordpress.com

it’s june, the month of weddings and what better time to talk about cakes. the first show i watched on the food channel was ace of cakes. i was totally hooked on this show like one gets hooked on a soap opera, i couldn’t wait for the next episode. what hooked me was the concept of making a cake-an edible object-a work of art and watching the cake go from concept to finished piece to it’s ultimate destruction in the end. the design, engineering and construction of it was amazing to watch as each week the cakes seemed to get more and more complex. unusual forms, painting, sculptural embellishments, color…lots of stuff, the more, the better, in my opinion. since then, i’ve noticed many visual artists exploring the cake form on a conceptual level, so i’ve compiled a little ‘taste’ or ‘bite’, if you will.

1. not just another pretty cake by rosebud cakes…here.

2. i know it’s not cake, but i couldn’t pass up including an edible cotton candy installation by Erno-Erik Raitanen…here.

3. amazing cut paper cake by Tahiti Pehrson…here.

4. fantastical over the top cake by renowned wedding cake artist Cile Bellefleur Burbidge…here.

5. a room-sized cake by scott hove…here.

6. one of my favorite cake makers, artist amy stevens….here.

7. totally decadent work by will cotton…here.

jackie winsor

lorraineglessner.wordpress.com

A quote from sculptor jackie winsor, who has explored process and repetition in her work for more than 25 years, “When you repeat an action again and again, you produce an effect of certainty or security in the viewers mind. You are not trying discover something or convince yourself. You’re dealing with certainty then as a formal concern and that soothes the viewer.”

sums up my encaustic conference lecture perfectly.

see more here, here and here and here.

beauty and the book

lorraineglessner.wordpress.com

I’m in love with books-as objects, as art…as friends. i love looking at them, paging through them, admiring the art of them, the craft on the outside as well as the inside and how the two come together to create a complete story.
i started reading at the age of 3, my sister at age 2 (she always wanted to do what i did ; ) i was an extremely shy and quiet child through my childhood and teenage years and i much preferred curling up in a quiet spot to read to doing anything else and in some ways, i’m still the same. i tried doing the kindle thing on my ipad, but i can’t get into it. holding a book’s weight in my hands, smelling the mixture of ink and paper, appreciating it’s structure, feeling the pages ruffle as i determine how far i am from the next chapter and totally escaping to immerse myself in another time and place within the narrative are just a few reasons why i’ll always have stacks of books lining my walls and why i’ll aways celebrate their physical presence as the well as the presence of their stories in my imagination.

an excerpt from the film, liberal arts

A: I love books. I do in, like, the dorkiest way possible.

J: Oh, me too. It’s a problem.

A: Like, I love trees cause they give us books.

J: super cool of the trees to do that, Right?

1. This ancient collection of 70 tiny books, their lead pages bound with wire, could unlock some of the secrets of the earliest days of Christianity. Academics are divided as to their authenticity but say that if verified, they could prove as pivotal as the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1947. The books were discovered five years ago in a cave in a remote part of Jordan to which Christian refugees are known to have fled after the fall of Jerusalem in 70AD. Important documents from the same period have previously been found there…here.

2. Rosamond Purcell, photographer, from Bookworm, published by Quantuck Lane Press. More about her and her work here.

3. random image from here.

4. Quran folio, surah al-Fatihah, 13th century AH/AD 19th century (Qajar), Iran from here.

5. sara mitchell handmade book experiments, here.

6. Rare books were once kept chained to bookshelves to prevent theft from here.

7. Jacqueline Rush Lee, artist, here.

8. Spaniel Binder The Book of Common Prayer Oxford 1700, here.

9. an abandoned library in russia, here.

10. matej kren, huge structure made of thousands of books, more here.

carin ingalsbe

lorraineglessner.wordpress.com

carin ingalsbe writes…

All things have a life and time line. With utilitarian things, the life of an object presents itself through the wear and tear of use. My current interest in photographing vintage clothing began with my desire to capture different aspects of the breakdown of a garment. Like African art, pieces of clothing are meant to be used until they are no longer usable. My desire to capture a moment in the life of a garment before it deteriorates is a way to understand each article of clothing and where it has been.

When I photograph a garment, I find its essence through handling it and working with it over a period of time. Sometimes the soul of the piece is revealed by turning it inside out or backwards.

The ballet presents a unique opportunity. Each garment expresses itself through an invaluable patina that has evolved through the course of incredibly talented dancers using these costumes. The journey that a costume takes is a singular road that cannot be duplicated. Because the costumes are threadbare and torn, they are, by definition, spent. My desire to reveal the value of each piece by rediscovering its pedigree is one that I hope comes through in my work. The evidence of use that each costume has sustained is the very thing that makes it worth considering. 

The attention to detail in the design of these costumes is staggering. Much of the nuance is impossible to see from the perspective of the audience. Perhaps the creators of these costumes intended to pay tribute to the dancers, elevating their experience through an intricately worked garment which beckons them to the role that they are about to perform.

i could look at her work all day…see more here.