Fabric Pattern & Image II Final Projects

Julia Haines
Flowers, Ashes, Blood
hand dyed, rust printed fabrics, hand constructed, sewn garments and head garland, mixed media, hand made book
Photo Credit: Abigail Muth

Mikaila Brennan
Untitled
natural dyes, compost printed fabrics, hand constructed, sewn garments
Model: Lauren Michelle

Noble Stultz
Sculptural Chair
Hand dyed, stuffed and constructed

Esther Scanlon
All I Need is in this Bag
Found garments, hand dyed, mended, repurposed, hand made book

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Team Textile @ The Pentaculum

I happily spent New Year’s Day packing my suitcase and part of my studio, so excited to drive down to Gatlinburg, TN for The 2nd Annual Pentaculum. I was honored to have received the invitation to participate in this exciting event at Arrowmont School of Arts & Crafts last year and as the event approached I just couldn’t wait to get there. I have previously taught workshops at Arrowmont and the facilities, food and staff are consistently top notch. The Pentaculum invites artists and writers at various stages in their careers to participate for a one week residency utilizing the studios, collaborating, socializing, etc. The five participating studios during this Pentaculum were Ceramics, 2D Painting, Sign Painting in the wood shop, Jewelry/Metals, Writing and Textiles. The event began with a slide show of all participants’ work, I was so impressed to be among such amazing artists and writers-just simply amazing PEOPLE. To spend a week working around them was an honor.

Of course the textiles studio is where I spent most of my time. Each artist in the studio with me was as individual, accomplished and amazing as their work. Most impressive is how much work each person produced in only one week-this is what uninterrupted time can do for an artist! I am pleased to share their work made during the Pentaculum with you here, please click on their names to visit their web sites for their complete body of work.

Stay tuned for my next blog post describing my personal experience and work created during the Pentaculum.

Loo Bain, who I am privileged to work with at Tyler spent her time repetitiously cutting, drawing 2d and drawing in space with fluorescent vinyl, mylar and other sparkly, shiny fabrics. By the end of the week, her colorful and tactile studies just begged to be touched.

Erin Castellan, our fearless studio coordinator, did a great job herding us cats all week, answering our questions and stitching, stitching, stitching. I have long been a fan of Erin’s work, which translates constructed fabrics of all kinds, thread and other embellishments into stitched paintings. The week of the Pentaculum, she meticulously stitched and beaded an lovely, intimate piece that I secretly covet.

Orly Cogan’s work is instantly recognizable-unabashed, large scale, stitched, collaged, painted pieces exploring feminine myths, identities and relationships. Orly was most at home collaborating with the 2D studio, where they created air brushed magic on her pieces.

Naomi Falk, sculptor & materials wizard, uses performance, clay, fabric, wood, stitch, paper and myriad other materials to investigate personal identities. During the Pentaculum, she experimented with many materials and made all of us in textiles studio amazing hand cut paper crowns!

Sonya Yong James’ work explores repetition, ritual and transcendence through simple felted forms, which become complex through multiples and repetition. During the Pentaculum, Sonya worked to combine felt and horse hair, making quiet, intimate samples-so impressive was her magnificent collection of various colors of horsehair!

Colleen Merrill was extremely prolific during the Pentaculum, especially considering that her constructed pieces are mainly hand sewn. She completed or got a good head start on a new series of soft sculpture pieces entitled ‘fawn’ exploring her new role as a mother.

Valerie Powell’s fun, colorful and approachable work is made with painted, stitched and sculpted shrinky-dinks! Too. Much. Fun. Just as fun was watching a wonderfully detailed, patterned painting take shape, along with some funky sculpted pieces during the week.

Karie Reinertson, owns and operates a multidisciplinary design studio with her partner husband. One of the specialties of the studio are exquisitely hand crafted leather handbags. Karie brought with her some beautiful buttery leather that she cut, braided and sculpted for a new fine art leather piece.

Rebecca Siemering works with paper-found, handmade, stitched, sculpted, constructed. During the Pentaculum, she continued work on her “Lottery Project”, created by stitched and constructed found lottery tickets collected from daily walks in her neighborhood.

Brooks Stevens turns straw into gold with an on-going project entitled ‘Mending Gold: Cloth, Architecture & Landscape’ in which she mends/repairs or simply highlights the essence of the object with stitched gold thread. During the Pentaculum, she methodically stitched a pair of jeans-mesmerizing was her meticulous process.

Melanie Wilder is a weaver who also creates naturally dyed weaving yarns with plants from her own garden. During the Pentaculum she dyed, stitched and labeled a wonderful dye sample book of various plants and mordants on cotton and wool yard and fabrics.

LM Wood collaborates with her computer to create quilts or quilt inspired works that speak to memory, time, history and narratives. Inspired by the photographic image, both found in thrift stores or through searches on her computer, and working with a wide variety of materials, she explores the many forms of narrative the photographic image can provide.

beauty and the book

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I’m in love with books-as objects, as art…as friends. i love looking at them, paging through them, admiring the art of them, the craft on the outside as well as the inside and how the two come together to create a complete story.
i started reading at the age of 3, my sister at age 2 (she always wanted to do what i did ; ) i was an extremely shy and quiet child through my childhood and teenage years and i much preferred curling up in a quiet spot to read to doing anything else and in some ways, i’m still the same. i tried doing the kindle thing on my ipad, but i can’t get into it. holding a book’s weight in my hands, smelling the mixture of ink and paper, appreciating it’s structure, feeling the pages ruffle as i determine how far i am from the next chapter and totally escaping to immerse myself in another time and place within the narrative are just a few reasons why i’ll always have stacks of books lining my walls and why i’ll aways celebrate their physical presence as the well as the presence of their stories in my imagination.

an excerpt from the film, liberal arts

A: I love books. I do in, like, the dorkiest way possible.

J: Oh, me too. It’s a problem.

A: Like, I love trees cause they give us books.

J: super cool of the trees to do that, Right?

1. This ancient collection of 70 tiny books, their lead pages bound with wire, could unlock some of the secrets of the earliest days of Christianity. Academics are divided as to their authenticity but say that if verified, they could prove as pivotal as the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls in 1947. The books were discovered five years ago in a cave in a remote part of Jordan to which Christian refugees are known to have fled after the fall of Jerusalem in 70AD. Important documents from the same period have previously been found there…here.

2. Rosamond Purcell, photographer, from Bookworm, published by Quantuck Lane Press. More about her and her work here.

3. random image from here.

4. Quran folio, surah al-Fatihah, 13th century AH/AD 19th century (Qajar), Iran from here.

5. sara mitchell handmade book experiments, here.

6. Rare books were once kept chained to bookshelves to prevent theft from here.

7. Jacqueline Rush Lee, artist, here.

8. Spaniel Binder The Book of Common Prayer Oxford 1700, here.

9. an abandoned library in russia, here.

10. matej kren, huge structure made of thousands of books, more here.

carin ingalsbe

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carin ingalsbe writes…

All things have a life and time line. With utilitarian things, the life of an object presents itself through the wear and tear of use. My current interest in photographing vintage clothing began with my desire to capture different aspects of the breakdown of a garment. Like African art, pieces of clothing are meant to be used until they are no longer usable. My desire to capture a moment in the life of a garment before it deteriorates is a way to understand each article of clothing and where it has been.

When I photograph a garment, I find its essence through handling it and working with it over a period of time. Sometimes the soul of the piece is revealed by turning it inside out or backwards.

The ballet presents a unique opportunity. Each garment expresses itself through an invaluable patina that has evolved through the course of incredibly talented dancers using these costumes. The journey that a costume takes is a singular road that cannot be duplicated. Because the costumes are threadbare and torn, they are, by definition, spent. My desire to reveal the value of each piece by rediscovering its pedigree is one that I hope comes through in my work. The evidence of use that each costume has sustained is the very thing that makes it worth considering. 

The attention to detail in the design of these costumes is staggering. Much of the nuance is impossible to see from the perspective of the audience. Perhaps the creators of these costumes intended to pay tribute to the dancers, elevating their experience through an intricately worked garment which beckons them to the role that they are about to perform.

i could look at her work all day…see more here.

vintage tools for making

i’ve been falling in love with vintage tools lately-the beauty of the form, the craftsmanship of the object itself…just looking at them, one gets a sense of the care, the love of the object that it was used to create. granted, these tools are mostly textile related, but i’m biased in that regard ; )

1. made from wood, mud, linen, string, paint, 2030-1802 BC, this percussion instrument called a paddle doll is modeled after a woman and consists of a flat piece of wood depicting the torso, rudimentary arms and neck, with “hair” made of beads strung on linen thread…here.

2. parts of a vintage African Ashanti Loom for Kente cloth. Kente is an ashanti ceremonial cloth that is hand woven on a horizontal treadle loom and the stripes are sewn together into larger pieces. kente cloth’s dates back to the 17th century and is a visual representation of african history, ethics, oral literature, philosophy, morality and religious beliefs…here.

3. vintage kenmore sewing machine model c877.15…here.

4. painted pine revolving spool holder with a pincushion finial, 19th century…here.

5. boston ballet costume, 1991…here.

6. scissors, c 1840, victoria & albert museum…here.

friday fragments

1. sea slug from the south andaman sea, by greg piper photography…see more here, 2. watercolor palette 3. strickrausch (knitting frenzy) at Bochuhm handmade fair, bochuhm, germany, 2012…see more here.

fun little tidbits to start your weekend off right…enjoy and be inspired!

chartreuse pattern

1. Friday Mosque, Herat, Afghanistan  2. Marron Farm in Caple, Christian Fletcher Photo Images…here  3. hotaru matsuri, firefly festival, japan  4. Copacabana 1970’s, Brazil  5. Fred Michel ginko leaves…here.