With Wax: Materiality & Mixed Media in Encaustic (Sneak Peek 2)

I may have jumped the gun when I introduced what I thought was the complete line-up of included artists in this show. I’m so pleased to announce two new additions, Deborah Kapoor and Cari Hernandez.

Title Image: Deborah Kapoor

We are in the home stretch for installation of With Wax, my curated show at the Chester County Art Association coming up in the first week of September! I can’t believe it, it’s been almost a year in planning. Please read my first article about this show, which includes images and statements from the eight other artists, as well as my curators statement.

I may have jumped the gun when I introduced what I thought was the complete line-up of included artists in this show. I’m so pleased to announce two new additions, Deborah Kapoor and Cari Hernandez. I have long been a fan of both of these artists…first, because they are amazing women and second, they have consistently made work that is always innovative, inspired and engaging for the many years that I have known them.

With the addition of Deborah’s and Cari’s work, the line-up of artists is finally complete. Please note that the images included in this article may/may not be work that will be included in the show.

I do hope to see some of you at the opening when I will be presenting an interactive encaustic demonstration. If you can’t make it to the opening, I hope you will come by and see the show, it’ll be up through September.

With Wax: Materiality & Mixed Media in Encaustic
September 8-30, 2022
Opening Reception & Encaustic Demonstration, September 8, 6-8 pm
Chester County Art Association, West Chester, Pennsylvania
Website

Deborah Kapoor – Washington, USA
I am inspired by cultural markers related to spaces the body inhabits. Universal themes I traverse include embodiment, destruction, renewal, legacy, perseverance, spirituality, and the space language and architecture occupy —  with a particular interest in the vulnerable.
My work is process-oriented, often beginning with a piece of fabric or paper, adding threads, ephemera, paint and markmaking — to create haptic, dimensional wall pieces, sculptural objects and installations
There is an inherent intimacy in what I make, no matter the scale. My attention lingers in the liminal, making connections between states of being and the need for belonging at a time when there is a poverty of empathy in our global community.

Cari Hernandez – California, USA
Her work combines rich color fields in conjunction with an elegant layering of line and pattern creating a developed depth of interest in each painting whereby the human experience is woven into her rich layers of material, creating a historical record for exploration. When working with other mediums such as oil or fiber, her focus continues to be centered on color study, shape, and form. She is endlessly inspired by her natural environment of the ocean, mountains, and wildlife that surround her in Sonoma County.   The sculptural work in this show is from a series I have been working on for the past decade, exploring the notion of thought, and how the strands of ideas might intertwine in/out of our reality.

With Wax: Materiality & Mixed Media in Encaustic (Sneak Peek)

When I was asked to curate an exhibition of encaustic work for the Chester County Art Association, I was over the moon and agreed to do it without batting an eye. I was given absolute freedom to include any artist and work around any theme, it was almost overwhelming. I went back to the only place I know…my Fiber roots.
I selected artist friends, former students and others whose work I long admired. This post is a sneak peek of who and what will be shown in September, I hope to see some of you at the show!

Title Image: Bonny Leibowitz

While I was teaching at Tyler School of Art, part of my departmental responsibilities was to curate the student shows each semester and the Annual Department Student Show in the Spring. It was an honor for me to showcase the fabulous work of select students from each course in the Fibers & Materials Studies Department and I have missed it terribly. I loved creating a visual narrative between disparate pieces of art, uniting them on one level, while maintaining the unique qualities and content of each on an individual level.

When I was asked to curate an exhibition of encaustic work for the Chester County Art Association, I was over the moon and agreed to do it without batting an eye. I was given absolute freedom to include any artist and work around any theme, it was almost overwhelming. I went back to the only place I know…my Fiber roots. I selected artist friends, former students and others whose work I long admired, I can’t wait to see their work come together. I invite all of you who are in the area to come by and see the show and hopefully, some of you can make it to the opening–some of the artists will be there and I will be giving a free encaustic demonstration! I will also be showing my experimental encaustic collages, books and sculptures in the smaller gallery (more about this show in a future post). Please read on for my curator’s statement, abbreviated statements of the included artists and a sampling of their work. Please note, that because most of work by each artist is specially created for this show, the work shown in this post is similar to, but not necessarily what will be included in the exhibition.

With Wax: Materiality & Mixed Media in Encaustic
September 8-28, 2022
Opening Reception & Encaustic Demonstration, September 8, 6-8 pm
Chester County Art Association, West Chester, Pennsylvania
Website

Curator’s Statement
Encaustic is my primary medium because of its smell, it’s luminosity and tactile qualities that are unmatched by any other medium. Although encaustic is a painter’s medium, I approach working with it is as a craftsperson. To me, my work is not about the act of painting, but rather, to develop a deep engagement with my materials, to perfect my technique and support my content at the same time. There is a distinct process involved with working in encaustic; apply the paint, fuse the layers, then scrape back or add more paint. It’s like a dance or a poem as the creation and meaning of each step or verse hinges on the other. As the process continues, the work becomes a manifestation of the compiling and arranging of fragments in repetitious sequences, creating a visual rhythm in the work.
This collection of work by a few very accomplished artists from the United States and Canada, displays my ongoing interest in the fusing of fine art disciplines with craft and design-based materials and processes. As the layers of materials come together in the work, so do the concepts of drawing and painting, fiber and craft, art and design, memory and time.
A significant part of working in contemporary fiber/craft is the consideration of process and material and how these things relate to the content in the work. The artists selected for this show all possess a sensitive and symbiotic relationship with their materials as well as present thoughtful and meaningful content in their work.
Although the common thread in this exhibition is wax, wax is not the star of this show. Rather, this show is about stretching the boundaries of materiality by combining unusual materials, tactility and most importantly, engaging content. It was important to me to present serious art that is also inviting, warm and inspiring. Art that encourages the viewer to feel as well as think. I purposely kept the list of artists relatively small, so that each artist could exhibit a body of work rather than just one or two pieces. Most of the work by each artist is specially created for this show, most of it is being shown for the first time. I’m truly grateful to each artist for agreeing to participate in this show, for striving to show their best work, and for consistently growing, thinking and innovating, acting as an ongoing inspiration for me and countless other artists.

Anna Wagner Ott-Ottowa, Canada
Wagner-Ott’s cages/nests began at the beginning of the pandemic in 2020.  Through those sculptures she interprets ideas of repression, entrapment, isolation and fragility using encaustic and mixed media. In 2022 she continues to create her nesting architectural forms but also integrates other materials such as Tyvek and her themes include the earth’s topologies.   

Bonny LeibowitzTexas, USA
I create objects and installations utilizing a variety of materials; plaster, encaustic, plastics, paper, foam, Tyvek, branches, roots, faux fur and wings, in ways that confuse the manufactured with the natural. I like to think of my work as fragments of a blown apart reality where forms collide and conjoin in myriad nuance and potential. “We are constantly creating the environment that creates us” – David Whyte

Alaina EnslenNew York, USA
I work with encaustic medium for its willingness to be transformed, fusing cloth and monotypes. The abstract collages that result are maps of my own making shaping the contours of memory and experience. 

Angela Hansen -BC, Canada
Angela’s pieces are inspired by the fantastical sculptural imagination of Mother Nature and the creative myriad of plant life.

Kelly Sheppard MurrayNorth Carolina, USA
Kelly Sheppard Murray’s multimedia sculptural work fashions a wide range of polymorphic, multicolored structures that have their roots in natural forms. She draws from the shapes of plants, moss, lichen, fungi, shells and geological forms. Collecting hundreds upon hundreds of sculptural elements, Murray slowly and deliberately assembles her pieces for installation—each one a unique building block within the visual language she articulates within her exhibitions. By developing her own malleable visual idiom, Murray expresses her curiosity and invites that of her audience. Further, through her careful and consistent day-to-day addition of sculptural elements, she reminds us how small steps can have a significant impact on both our perceptions of the world and our environment itself.

Skyler McGeeIllinois, USA
Based on the sculptural quality of landscapes, this work explores the process of reorienting oneself after global and personal upheaval. Through mapping macro and micro perspectives, these sculptural paintings act as talismans of place, and vehicles through which to mark movement and find solid ground.

Lindsay Fort Pennsylvania, USA
I am attracted to objects that show the evidence of time.  In my work I develop surfaces and combine various found materials with an interest in style and age in visual culture.

Nancy SandersGeorgia, USA
Nancy Sanders art draws from her inward journey of personal introspection
of deep separation, transformation, and connectedness. It explores the mystery of human life from a multidimensional context, providing the viewer with the possibility of self-reflection, and therefore the possibility of reconciliation.

Brown Pink Residency: Thoughts and Afterthoughts

I was so fortunate to have been invited by R&F Paints to delve into their new Brown Pink Residency Program for two weeks in February-March. I worked really intensely and ended up making more work than I usually make at home in a year…


I was so fortunate to have been invited by R&F Paints to delve into their new Brown Pink Residency Program for two weeks in February-March. For an artist inspired by hiking and immersing oneself in the environment, this was the perfect two weeks to be in Kingston, New York. I saw bitter cold, a couple of snowstorms, ice chunks on the Hudson the size of buildings, plus a surprise few days of sunny, spring-like temperatures..and I attended a fabulous opening of a group exhibition of collage at The Lockwood Gallery. I took advantage of those spring like days to get out of my own head, photograph and be inspired. Even though I took those breaks, most of my time was spent eating a lot, sleeping little and basically wearing the same clothes everyday…I also made a ton of work, some of it I really like and will continue to explore.

I love my self made residencies sequestered in sunny Florida, but it was wonderful to have a real studio filled with luscious paints and visitors to talk to from time to time. Because this residency was scheduled for a much shorter time than I’m used to, I had a list of things I wanted to accomplish and pretty much did them all. Most of it was work I had in my head to make for a long time… Some of it worked, some of it didn’t, but I kept moving, following my instincts, plugging away and trying not to be too hard on myself. I worked really intensely and ended up making more work than I usually make at home in a year…not necessarily in quantity, but in exponential growth and conceptual quality, because what came out in the end were the beginnings of several distinctive bodies of work that will continue for years. I describe the work below in detail with image examples and notes from my sketchbook and Instagram posts I wrote during the residency.

I started with this fun group of collages made from cutting up my encaustic mono-prints on Masa and rice papers. I was inspired to do this with my acrylic paintings during my class late last year with Stephen Aimone so I wanted to see what I could do in encaustic. These pieces were fun to make, whimsical, a bit silly and almost cartoonish at first glance. I like them, they’re so different for me. What I’m learning about myself through this work is that painting is not enough for me. I do want to make that painted mark, but I also want to isolate it, reinterpret it through the cutting and then manipulate it further through layers and materials, changing its context and content. The possibilities are endless. Another important lesson I’m learning is that the typical painting in the square/rectangle format is also not enough for me. I have always worked to escape it when experimenting, only to return to it when the work becomes ‘solid’. The biggest reason why I do this is because the rectangular format is what a painting IS, the rectangle is what is acceptable., it’s what is most people purchase and feel comfortable hanging on their walls, but are these good enough reasons? I’m exploring this in my thoughts and work, there is much more to think and write about on this topic.


Last year during my Florida residency I was inspired to burn layers of paper, but my vision was not complete and I got stuck on where to go next. Now a year later, I pulled out this pile of burned paper to try to make some sense out of it. My original intention was to bind it all together, but now I’m seeing separate ‘books’ with drawings or paintings on the ‘covers’ or conversely, separating them, collaging them and burning again-which is likely what will happen. The best part about being in a residency is that I don’t have to know where it’s going and I can just plug away until it turns to gold-or ash, as it were. I’m intrigued by the dichotomy of fire-it’s destructive powers as well as it’s ability to fertilize life after destruction. I’m constantly reminded of fire’s acute beauty as I hiked around Florida, as almost everywhere I went there is evidence of controlled burns in the forested areas. It’s also in Florida that I began my photo journal of bark-peeling; burned, marked, degraded, moss covered, etc., so many different looks that bark carries-all of which resemble skin and as I photograph, I recall my own fragility and vulnerability-both physical and emotional.


I grew up on the Delaware river centuries ago when huge ice chunks would flow and collide in the strong current, creating a gorgeous sculptural spectacle. Even while watching it go by as an apathetic teenager, drinking instant coffee and smoking a cigarette at the bus stop, I was awed by it. Unfortunately, I haven’t seen ice like that in years, but was treated to the frozen patterns and sculptural amazingness along the Hudson River that brought such inspiration to my studio work. I took hundreds of photographs that are paintings in and of themselves and these inspired a more muted palette as well as some of the forms in the following collages. As i look back at some of the sketchbook drawings I’ve been doing over the last year, I can see the similarities in the forms in the ice. You can see a video of my ice photographs, past drawings, present collages here.


I’ve had it in my head to make work like the following collages for a long time and they turned out better than I’d thought-that doesn’t always happen and I’m thrilled that it did. They are inspired by my multitude of photographs of Philly and other city walls taken over 20 years and and are born out of inspiration from urban layers and grids, piles of studio ephemera and process. This is the most exciting series I made during the residency, but unfortunately, I can speak the least about it because this pieces are so new. However, they will be the first series I’ll pick up on when I can next work unencumbered in the studio.


The last goal I had for this residency was to make more ‘worry blocks’. This is an ongoing encaustic sculpture series I started at a time when I was very much in transition with my work and life and this series came about as a way to sort out my thoughts through meditative process. I call them ‘worry blocks’ because these pieces are the vehicles by which I deposit my worries. Through the repetitive process of burning holes and using encaustic to place my hair strand by strand in grid patterns on scorched found wood, I think, reflect and heal. I’ve had a nervous habit since I was little of twisting my hair when I’m stressed or contemplating and I keep a bag of it in the studio that I add to frequently. I have been using horse hair as well as my own hair in my work for quite some time. It makes a beautiful line in the wax and it also speaks to the bodily connections that have always been at the core of my work.  I first showed my worry blocks at the old R&F Paints Gallery in 2011 where they were very well received and this encouraged me to keep making them. I don’t make them much, but I had a goal to have them come full circle to be shown in the new R&F Paints Gallery called Work In Progress this April. The show is called Beauty in the Breakdown and will present a sampling of my favorite pieces from the residency as well as 6 new worry blocks. See some earlier pieces from this series here.

Worry Blocks, encaustic, pyrography, horse and human hair on found wood


During this residency, I also pulled a ream of encaustic monoprints as ‘warm-ups’ before getting started each day. I’m writing about those separately along with new favorite R&F colors for next month’s blog post. For more photos on my residency work at Brown Pink, visit my Instagram and Youtube and go see the show in April at R&F! Many thanks to you for reading and to @rfpaints for this tremendous opportunity.

Light & Shadow

The mix of light and darkness faintly reflect another world by the creation of shadows. Shadows create a suggestion of space, creating a reality where none existed in total darkness.

I’m grateful to have been invited to give an artist talk recently to a lovely and receptive audience from Catalyst Art Lab. Before Covid, I had been giving talks like this a few times a year in some form-short versions at gallery openings and longer versions with slides to college students, collectors and others artist groups. Before I present one of these talks, there are a number of hours spent updating the words and images of past work to put into context what I’m currently doing in the studio. Some of this updating entails reaching far back into the past to read my graduate thesis paper written 2002-2003. Please enjoy the following excerpt on Light and Shadow from said paper…It’s always fun to delve into the past to see that the more things change, the more they stay the same.

Light and Shadow

Light has many forms and associated meanings which range from its inherently luminous physical properties to its intangible metaphorical and conceptual inclinations. Light “can be natural or artificial, direct or reflected, interior or exterior…transcendent and mystical.”[1] Dawn, sun breaking through clouds and moonlight all bring a sense of relief to us in some way as they symbolize a new beginning, another chance to live and love. “Light throws doors and windows open, makes wall transparent, spans unlikely distances, links matter and spirit.”[2] Light lives in us, around us, compelling us toward life and serving as a reminder of hope, peace and harmony.

“God is called Light, not so much for His spirit, or essence, as for His very energy.”[3] Light embodies many things, but most importantly, light is known to all humans in some way as the direct opposite of darkness and evil. Darkness does not exist as a physical phenomenon as light exists, but is only revealed by the contrast of the absence of light. Elements in our physical space are not noticed unless the light and the atmosphere creating that light exist to eradicate the darkness. In the physical world, contrasts and differences of values of space serve to express light and with that light comes a reflection of righteousness and Divinity. This can be true in the spiritual sense as the presence of light illuminates that which was dark within us. Aspects of our spiritual selves that were previously unnoticed are revealed by the light, thus provoking an awakening, an arousal of the spirit. This inner illumination emanates as a glow, a sourceless radiance that originates from the soul and implores outward reflection. Coming in contact with this luminousness spreads warmth and solace, filling the world with a sense of harmony. In this sense, light signifies all that is good in the universe as it peacefully pervades the physical darkness in our lives and expresses the spiritual “cosmic forces…the divine element in nature, invisible but present.”[4]

The mix of light and darkness faintly reflect another world by the creation of shadows. Shadows create a suggestion of space, creating a reality where none existed in total darkness. “Shadows hold no physicality, yet they are so critical to our seeing, we cannot see form without them.”[5] The play of light and shadow on surfaces creates shifting pockets of space which unite and harmonize forms, allowing us to visually make sense and create a semblance of order to our lives. “There are those who leave the fire and move toward the deeper reaches of the forest where they believe a source of light to exist which is more intense. A light that breathes, not at all a fixed symbol, a light that alludes yet beckons-the unity of which lies hidden in the chaos.”[6] The shadows that light casts can work to conceal and even to deceive, but the importance of the shadow lies in what it can reveal.

“The ways of darkness always come to an end before long, but the mystery of light we find to reach on and on forever.”[7] Light radiates warmth and comfort to all life on a daily basis. The reality of light is that it exists as a constant physical, living presence in our lives-as our shield from death-for without it there is no life. Its existence compels us to revel in its beauty, simplicity and life-sustaining power.


[1] Jarmusch, Stalking the Light, p. 1.
[2] Graef, Heinz, Light in Pictures, (Western Germany, Herder & Company, 1954), p. 14. Hereafter cited as Graef, Light in Pictures.
[3] Reutersward, Patrick, “What Color is Divine Light?” from Light in Art, (New York, New York, Macmillon Company, 1971), p. 123.
[4] Graef, Light in Pictures, p. 14.
[5] Irwin, Robert in Robert Irwin: The Beauty of Questions, (video production/director, Leonard Feinstein, 1997)
[6] Terrae, Imago, Paul Jenkins: Broken Prisms, (Paris, France, Galilee Editions, 1989), p. 189.
[7] Graef, Light in Pictures, p. 18.

Image: Early Spring Fresh, encaustic monoprint on rice paper, 9.5×11

Finding Your Creative Truth: Artist Professional Development Retreat

Students of all levels are encouraged to participate in this professional development workshop that will focus on the thoughtful creation of art, ways to improve content and how to self critique, while also expressing personal values, beliefs and aesthetic interests.

Great things are done by a series of small things brought together.
– Vincent van Gogh

What Finding Your Creative Truth: Artist Professional Development Retreat

When July 25-28, 2022

Monday 7-9pm Orientation
Tuesday-Wednesday, 9am-4:00pm Workshop Hours
Thursday, 9:00am-2pm Workshop Hours

(Scroll down for detailed daily itinerary)

Where  Railroad House, Historic Marietta, Pennsylvania

Limited to 12 participants!
Level: All Levels
$1500 includes accommodations** (See the list of available rooms below), breakfast and lunch and most workshop materials (see supply list below)

Not Interested in Railroad Inn Accommodations, breakfast or lunch?
$1000 includes workshop fee and most materials (see supply list below)

Registration Instructions if staying at Railroad House:
1. See the list below for available rooms and brief description of each. You can get a sense of the rooms by viewing the images below or visiting the Railroad House Website. DO NOT book the room from the Railroad House website!!!
2. Contact Lorraine via email lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com with the number of the room you’d like to book and for payment details.

Available Rooms at Railroad House as of December 22, 2021
*NOTE* All rooms include a private bath and TV unless otherwise noted.

  • Room #3: Queen bed
  • Room #4: King bed/balcony 
  • Room #5: King bed/mini fridge/ largest room
  • Room #7: Queen bed
  • Room #8: Queen bed
  • Room #9: Queen bed
  • Room #10: King bed
  • Room #11: King bed
  • Room #12/Suite: Shared Room…King bed with 2nd roll-in bed, bathtub and mini fridge. No TV. *NOTE* Because this room is double occupancy, two participants who choose this room will pay $1350 total for the workshop.

Additional Accommodations Near Marietta

Susquehanna Manor Bed and Breakfast 
BF Heistand House Bed and Breakfast 
Comfort Inn, Columbia PA

Payment Payment of 50% of the workshop fee + materials + accommodations ($750 if paying via check or Venmo, $777 if paying via Paypal) is due at the time of registration with the remaining 50% ($750) due approximately 6 weeks before the workshop date. Please contact Lorraine for payment details.

For Registration, Please Contact: Lorraine Glessner, lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com

Who A collaborative teaching venture with Terri Yacovelli &
Lorraine Glessner (Scroll down for more about Lorraine and Terri)

Workshop Description

Create, reflect, rejuvenate and connect with other artists in an inspiring atmosphere full of history and nature. Students of all levels are encouraged to participate in this professional development workshop that will focus on the thoughtful creation of art, ways to improve content and how to self critique, while also expressing personal values, beliefs and aesthetic interests. Daily walks led by the instructors explore the natural beauty of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania and the Susquehanna River and provide inspiration for expressive mark-making, journaling and meditation in situ as well as subsequent mixed media studio experimentation to further your practice. Daily readings, writing prompts and group discussions encourage self reflection and help identify and conceptually develop your ideas. Participants are invited to expand upon a current body of work or begin a new series based on techniques learned in the workshop. Optional individual critiques with both instructors is offered to all participants.

**Please note that participants should be prepared to spend time outside as well as in the studio. Any participant unable to take part in the outdoor activities are welcome to opt out and alternative indoor creative exercises will be provided.

Detailed Workshop Itinerary

Monday 6-8pm Orientation
Introductions, Overview of the retreat. Wine/snacks by the fire pit in the courtyard of the RailRoad House Inn. Brief discussion about finding your artistic voice.

Tuesday
Breakfast 7-8am, Lunch 11-12, Dinner on your own
9-4:00 Workshop
Brief writing discussion and presentation of Art Inspired by Nature. Walk along the Susquehanna River and/or carpool to Chickie’s Rock. Sketchbook activity, journaling by the water exploring water as subject matter. After lunch, we will return to the studio to expand on the morning sketches and written exercises to explore your personal relationship with nature. Evening reading and writing prompts to organize your thoughts.

Wednesday
Breakfast 7-8am, Lunch 11-12, 7:00pm Dinner on your own or Optional Group Dinner
9-4:00 Workshop
Morning journaling in courtyard, reading discussion and discussion of Art Inspirations from Environment, Objects & Architecture. Walks around Marietta to take photos, work in sketchbooks, develop ideas. After lunch studio exploration works on paper, journaling and individual talks with both instructors. Evening reading and writing prompts to organize your thoughts.

Thursday
Breakfast 7-8am, Lunch 11-12
9-2:00 Workshop
After morning discussion, we will continue with uninterrupted work time to further explore new ideas and relate them to current ideas, develop conceptual ideas, read, write, walk by the river and informally discuss your progress with both instructors.
After lunch we will have a show and tell discussion of the work created this week, share inspiration images and journal writings.

What Else?

  • Color relationships, composition, application, content, proportion, scale as an effective foundation for other painterly information.
  • Mark-making exercises geared toward making simple or complex marks to generate a personal language.
  • The option of an Individual Consultation/Critique discussion with each instructor. Bring a piece of work, a question, a concern, a problem and discuss it with Terri and Lorraine.
  • Some guided meditation time and planned hikes will relax and open your mind and spirit to the land, helping to support and nurture your unique creative voice.
  • A slide talk with examples of contemporary artists whose work applies the ideas and concepts discussed in the workshop is offered for inspiration.
  • Lots of open studio time to explore and interpret the inspiration gained from the meditations and hikes. Work on a current body of work or start a new project.

SCROLL DOWN TO THE END OF THIS POST TO SEE Images of student work and fun scenes from encaustic retreats at Lareau Farm Inn in 2021, student work and images from other workshops taught by Terri and Lorraine.
For more images of past Artist Retreats co-taught by Lorraine visit here, here and here. Additional blog posts related to artist retreats co-taught by Lorraine are here, here and here..

For Registration, Please Contact: Lorraine Glessner, lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com

Images of Historic Railroad House Inn & Marietta
For more images and information visit the Railroad House website.


About Terri Yacovelli

http://www.terriyacovelli.com/
Instagram @tyacovelli
Terri Yacovelli holds a MLA from McDaniel College and a BSE from Millersville University.  As a long time Adjunct Professor of Art at York College of Pennsylvania and studio art teacher, she has had the opportunity to share her love of art and art history with a diverse group of students. Her explorations with textured surfaces in mixed media led her to the exciting world of encaustic painting.   Terri’s art embodies the inherent abstract characteristics in which an interplay of shape, texture, color and line quality explore physical and spiritual journeys.  Additionally, her appreciation for the natural world enlivens her art with a relatable experience for the viewer. Her work has been exhibited locally and regionally in galleries and juried exhibitions.  She is a recent recipient of a Professional Development Grant from the Cultural Alliance of York and received an Award of Distinction from the 2021 YorkFest Juried Art Exhibition.  

About Lorraine Glessner


lorraineglessner.net
Instagram @lorraineglessner1
Lorraine Glessner’s love of surface, pattern, markmaking, image and landscape has led her to combine disparate materials and processes such as silk, wood, wax, pyrography, rust, paper and more in her work. Lorraine is a former Assistant Professor at Tyler School of Art, Temple University, a workshop instructor and an award-winning artist. She holds an MFA from Tyler School of Art, Temple University, a BS from Philadelphia University, and an AAS in Computer Graphics from Moore College of Art & Design. She has a diverse art background with skills that include painting, sculpture, graphic design, interior design, textile design, photography, digital imaging and much more. Among her most recent professional achievements is a Second Place award in Sculpture from Art of the State at the State Museum in Harrisburg, PA, a recently completed artist residency at Jentel Foundation and an acquisition by Kelsey-Seybold Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. Lorraine’s work is included in the recently released Encaustic Art in the 21st Century by Ashley Rooney and Nuance, a curated book by artist, Michelle Stuart. Lorraine frequently lectures and participates on academic panels at various Conferences including The International Encaustic Conference, SECAC and The College Art Association Annual Conference. Her work is exhibited locally and nationally in galleries, museums, craft centers, schools, libraries, universities, and more. Like her work, Lorraine brings to her teaching a strong interdisciplinary approach, mixed with a balance of concept, process, history, experimentation, problem solving and discovery.


Workshop Supplies & Materials
Materials Included: The following list of materials is provided for the student

  • Paper Towels, Watercups
  • India Ink
  • Lyra Water Soluble Graphite Pencils 
  • Charcoal
  • Some collage papers 
  • Colored Pencils/Markers
  • Pastel Chalk, Oil Pastels
  • Extra Brushes 

What to bring: the following is a list of materials for the student to bring to the workshop (Visit Lorraine’s Amazon Store for Art Supply/Portable Art Supply Ideas)

  • Sketchbook/notebook, pencil or pen for note taking
  • Drawing Pencils, Black Sharpie Marker
  • Portable watercolor sketchbook (lay flat size 9 x 12, mixed media or watercolor sketchbook, heavy stock to withstand wet media, (Strathmore 300 Mixed Media (117 lb) is an excellent choice)
  • Watercolor Paint Set, Brushes
  • 1-2 drawing media of your choice (pencil, pastel, conte charcoal, oil pastel, Crayon, graphite, Sharpie felt pen, etc.)
  • Closed toe shoes for safety in the studio
  • 2-4 actual OR images of your work, digital prints or phone/iPad sharing is fine
  • materials for collage (fabric, papers, magazine images, photos, etc.)

Hiking Equipment Recommendations

  • Sturdy hiking shoes/boots
  • Sun block/bug spray
  • Small waterproof cushion or portable chair
  • Butt pack or small backpack
  • Comfortable clothing
  • Light rainwear
  • Hat
  • Water bottle
  • For art supply/portable art supply/hiking or travel ideas, visit Lorraine’s Amazon Store

Cancellation
Please note a $100 cancelation processing fee will be deducted from any refund.
In the event that you need to cancel your workshop, please notify Lorraine via email.
Cancelations made 30 days or more from the workshop start date will be refunded their deposit (minus $100 processing fee).
Cancelations made 30 days or less from the workshop start date will be refunded their deposit (minus $100 processing fee) only if the space can be filled. If the space cannot be filled, no refund will be issued.

For Registration, Please Contact: Lorraine Glessner, lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com

Images of student work and fun scenes from encaustic retreats at Lareau Farm Inn in 2021, student work and images from other workshops taught by Terri and Lorraine.
For more images of past Artist Retreats co-taught by Lorraine visit here, here and here. Additional blog posts related to artist retreats co-taught by Lorraine are here, here and here..

New Virtual Workshop: Fast & Loose Encaustic Painting

You love the fast moving, layering and quick drying abilities of acrylic painting, but you want more depth, more scraping abilities, more texture and more dimension that can only be achieved by painting in encaustic…well, you’ve come to the right place!

If you could say it with words, there would be no reason to paint. –Edward Hopper

Fast & Loose Encaustic Painting
A Live Virtual Zoom Workshop
Registrants will receive a Zoom link to join the workshop & will have access to the recorded sessions for a limited time following the workshop.

Limited to 10 participants!
Level: Beginner to Advanced

When
2 Days-April  29-30, 2021
12pm-2:30pm EST each day
*We will take at least 2 5-minute breaks each day

Price
$350

2 Ways to Register
1. *PREFERRED* Venmo: Send to @Lorraine-Glessner
2. Paypal: Send to lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com

Who
For Lorraine’s bio, portfolio, exhibitions, teaching and anything else you might want to know, please visit her web site.

Basic Description

You love the fast moving, layering and quick drying abilities of acrylic painting, but you want more depth, more scraping abilities, more texture and more dimension that can only be achieved by painting in encaustic…well, you’ve come to the right place! I developed this workshop at the request and with the collaboration from several artists. In this workshop, I offer alternative tools, color mixing, application methods and techniques for faster, more process oriented encaustic painting. Also discussed are tips for getting out of your head, letting go and letting it flow. It is helpful, but not necessary to have had any previous experience with the encaustic medium to take this workshop.

SCROLL DOWN TO SEE images of student work from encaustic workshops similar in content to this one.
Read Part 1 of Fast & Loose Encaustic Painting: Tools
Read Part 2 of Fast & Loose Encaustic Painting: Painting Methods

Who should take this workshop?

  • You’re a painter and have always wanted to work in encaustic but have been deterred by what seems like a slow moving, laborious process compared to other painting mediums like acrylics and oils.
  • You fill sketchbooks with mixed media acrylic sketches that you love, but you want more depth, more scraping abilities, more texture and more dimension that can only be achieved by painting in encaustic
  • You tend to think too hard about the next step and end up stifling the process.
  • You’ve worked in encaustic for a while and have never scraped your layers(!) to reveal the awesomeness underneath.
  • You want to know what the heck Encaustic PaintSmash is and how it will benefit your work.
  • You spend too much time on one painting and tend to overwork the painting.
  • You love encaustic painting and are looking for some alternatives to the usual encaustic painting methods.
  • You are frustrated with your current body of work, your process(es) and want to create consistency, and a cohesive portfolio.
  • You want to express yourself in a more meaningful way with your work.
  • Your creative process is stagnating and you want to learn a new process, idea or technique.
  • You have always wanted to create ‘visual poetry’ in your paintings.


What happens in this workshop? What will I learn?

  • Marking, drawing, making marks with fun exercises are sure to relax you so that you don’t even know you’re drawing and are designed for you to generate ideas, content and a personal mark.
  • Learn tips for getting out of your own way so your painting process flows.
  • Learn how to apply encaustic paint in layers and in various levels of transparency, as well as how and when to scrape back to reveal exciting forms and patterns within the layers.
  • Learn how to use the transparency of the wax to allow pattern and information to combine and ‘talk’ within the painting.
  • Experiment with doodling, mark making and process to create a personal vocabulary of marks.
  • How to effectively use the palette for mixing and painting in encaustic.
  • Learn how to use stencils, marks, pattern and the grid to organize the ‘chaos’.
  • Learn alternatives in tools, painting and scraping methods from the ‘usual’ encaustic techniques.
  • Learn how fun PaintSmash is and how it can spice up your work.
  • Something new, fun, fast and loose.


Included in all of my encaustic workshops

  • Color, composition, application, content-the basics, the intermediate, the advanced.
  • Using color relationships, proportion, scale as an effective foundation for other painterly information.
  • Individual consultation/critique discussion with each participant. Bring a piece of work, a question, a concern, a problem and discuss it with me. My most favorite part of the workshop is this special time I spend talking one-on-one with each participant.
  • Learn how to use encaustic’s strengths (layering, transparency, luminosity) to tell your story.
  • Mark-making exercises-geared toward making simple or complex marks to generate a personal voice.
  • Group sharing and discussion-always an amazingly helpful time for participants to share their victories and struggles.
  • A slide talk with examples of contemporary artists whose work applies the concepts discussed in the workshop is offered for inspiration. Some examples of the slides included in the talks for this workshop is just below.
  • Individual and group instruction/critique throughout the workshop.


    SUGGESTED MATERIALS PARTICIPANTS HAVE IN THEIR STUDIO

    • Read this blog post for tools ideas-please note, you don’t have to have these materials but you might see something you’d like to try.
    • 2-4 wooden painting panels (your preference of 8×8 or 10×10, but no larger or smaller, please) (nothing coated in acrylic or acrylic gesso!!)
    • 3-5 natural hair brushes  for encaustic painting (1 smallish-no bigger than 1.5” brush will be designated your medium brush, so it must be free of color.
    • 1lb encaustic medium from any company
    • Heat gun and/or Iwatani torch
    • Sketchbook or Drawing paper
    • Package of razor blades or clay scraper
    • Any small sharp-ended tool for incising/writing/drawing into the wax (sewing or knitting needles are great)
    • Basic encaustic colors
    • 1-2 RF paintsticks

      OPTIONAL MATERIALS 
    • Double sided scraper tool-available for purchase here
    • Mark-making tools…Woody, litho crayon, graphite paper, charcoal, oil pastel, etc.
    • Decorative stencils, mesh, doilies, etc-anything flat with open areas that can be used as a stencil
    • Various materials for collage (papers, magazine images, photos, etc.)

What kind of work will I make?

Please enjoy these works in progress that were created by workshop participants during workshops similar to this one.

2 Ways to Register
1. *PREFERRED* Venmo: Send to @Lorraine-Glessner
2. Paypal: Send to lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com

New Virtual Workshop: Encaustic Pattern &Repetition

Repeated use of a shape, color, design element unifies composition, creates pattern and rhythm as well as reinforces content. This workshop focuses on the creation of intricate patterns, expressive personal surfaces and multi-layered encaustic paintings.

When you repeat an action again and again, you produce an effect of certainty or security in the viewer’s mind. –Jackie Winsor

Mixed Media Encaustic Pattern & Repetition
A Live Virtual Zoom Workshop
Registrants will receive a Zoom link to join the workshop & will have access to the recorded sessions for a limited time following the workshop.

Limited to 10 participants!
Level: Beginner to Intermediate

When
3 Wednesdays-April  7, 14, 21, 2021
12pm-3pm EST each day

Price
$450

3 Ways to Register
1. *PREFERRED* Venmo: Send to @Lorraine-Glessner
2. Paypal: Send to lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com
3. Check: Email lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com for mailing address (check must be received at least 5 days before workshop start date)

Who
For Lorraine’s bio, work, exhibitions, teaching and anything else you might want to know, please visit her web site.

Basic Description

Repeated use of a shape, color or design element unifies composition, creates pattern, rhythm and movement as well as reinforces content. This workshop focuses on the creation of intricate patterns, expressive personal surfaces and complex, multi-layered pieces utilizing and in combination with encaustic painting techniques. With an emphasis on mixed media, methods and materials covered in this workshop include the use of organic and geometric form, realistic and abstract imagery, patterned collage, stencils, candy molds, tjaps, and branding (creating marks with heated metal and wood burning tools). Spacing the sessions to once a week allows for participants to experiment and truly delve into the techniques learned. Considerations such as using pattern and repetition as content itself, to tell a story, support and/or strengthen the message will also be discussed.

SCROLL DOWN TO SEE images of student work from encaustic workshops similar in content to this one. Additional blog posts related to other encaustic workshops taught by Lorraine are herehere and here.

Who should take this workshop?

  • You swoon over textiles, prints, decorative arts, design, anything with pattern and you want to learn how to effectively incorporate these elements into your work.
  • You already include lots of pattern and repetition in your work, but the work hasn’t moved past mere decoration to involve meaningful content.
  • You desperately want to include pattern in your work, but you are fearful that it will be received by the viewing public as decorative art.
  • You love image and collage, but when you embed these elements into encaustic, the collage is blurred, burned or looks clunky.
  • You love painting with the intensely pigmented color of encaustic and want to learn how to effectively apply it-how to mix color, how and when to dilute, what brushes and tools to use.
  • You are frustrated with your current body of work, your process(es) and want to create consistency, and a cohesive portfolio.
  • You want to express yourself in a more meaningful way with your work.
  • Your creative process is stagnating and you want to learn a new process, idea or technique.
  • You have always wanted to create ‘visual poetry’ in your paintings.


What happens in this workshop? What will I learn?

  • What a motif is and how you can generate one to create personal patterns with meaning and how to incorporate them into your work.
  • Create personally designed fabrics and papers using indigo, rust and compost printing and use them as a basis for a painting.
  • Create repetitive patterns using innovative tools and techniques such as pyrography (making marks with heated metal and tools), tjaps and candy molds.
  • Learn my technique for applying decorative stenciling into my work and how you can use stenciling to strengthen your compositions and content.
  • Learn how to apply encaustic paint in layers and in various levels of transparency, as well as how and when to scrape back to reveal exciting forms and patterns within the layers.
  • Practice the effective application and fusing of encaustic collaged layers so you aren’t tempted to give up collage forever in frustration!
  • Experiment with doodling, mark making and process to create personal patterns.
  • Learn how to use the transparency of the wax to allow pattern and information to combine and ‘talk’ within the painting.
  • Learn how repetitive pattern, symbols, text, ornament adds power and interest to the work and therefore brings the viewer closer to its message.
  • How repetition can create visual poetry, rhythm, music, etc within the work.


Included in all of my encaustic workshops

  • Color, composition, application, content-the basics, the intermediate, the advanced.
  • Using color relationships, proportion, scale as an effective foundation for other painterly information.
  • Individual consultation/critique discussion with each participant. Bring a piece of work, a question, a concern, a problem and discuss it with me. My most favorite part of the workshop is this special time I spend talking one-on-one with each participant.
  • Learn how to use encaustic’s strengths (layering, transparency, luminosity) to tell your story.
  • Mark-making exercises-whether you are taking the line workshop or not, exercises geared toward making simple or complex marks to generate a personal voice.
  • Book-sharing-each participant brings their favorite art book to share.
  • Group sharing and discussion-always an amazingly helpful time for participants to share their victories and struggles.
  • A slide talk with examples of contemporary artists whose work applies the concepts discussed in the workshop is offered for inspiration. Some examples of the slides included in the talks for this workshop is just below.
  • 30 minute one on one consultation with Lorraine.
  • Individual and group instruction/critique throughout the workshop.
    SUGGESTED MATERIALS PARTICIPANTS HAVE IN THEIR STUDIO

    • 3-5 wooden painting panels (your preference of 8×8 or 10×10, but no larger or smaller, please) (nothing coated in acrylic or acrylic gesso!!)
    • 3-5 natural hair brushes  for encaustic painting (1 smallish-no bigger than 1.5” brush will be designated your medium brush, so it must be free of color.
    • 1lb encaustic medium from any company
    • Sketchbook or Drawing paper
    • Package of razor blades or scraper
    • Various materials for collage (papers, magazine images, photos, etc.)
    • Any small sharp-ended tool for incising/writing/drawing into the wax (sewing or knitting needles are great)
    • Basic encaustic colors
    • Decorative stencils, mesh, doilies, etc-anything flat with open areas that can be used as a stencil
    • Masking or Painters tape
    • Carbon or Graphite transfer paper

      OPTIONAL MATERIALS 

Pattern & Repetition Slides Examples

What kind of work will I make?

Please enjoy the work example pics below from participants who have previously taken this workshop. Please also visit additional blog posts here and here and here for more information related to this workshop.

3 Ways to Register
1. *PREFERRED* Venmo: Send to @Lorraine-Glessner
2. Paypal: Send to lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com
3. Check: Email lorraineglessnerstudio@gmail.com for mailing address (check must be received at least 5 days before workshop start date)

Should Professional Artists Take Workshops?

I spend a good deal of my time sharing with and teaching others and although I learn a lot from my students, sometimes I want to be in the student seat, having fun and making a mess with new ideas, new products and new voices.

Lately, I’ve heard criticism that professional artists shouldn’t speak about taking workshops or classes because they then are relegated to student and are thought of as not as serious about their work. Well, using the wise words of my fourth grade teacher, Mrs. Colletello-that’s hogwash! I take workshops because I AM serious about my work, about growing and expanding on my ideas in the studio and realizing that this sometimes doesn’t happen in a vacuum. I spend a good deal of my time sharing with and teaching others and although I learn a lot from my students, sometimes I want to be in the student seat, having fun and making a mess with new ideas, new products and new voices. To be clear, I don’t make a habit of taking classes, mainly because I think that too many workshops messes with studio mojo, but about every third year I choose an instructor whose work I respect and take a workshop with them. I have about five on my wishlist of futures and last month I took advantage of being Covid-bound and was finally able to take a virtual workshop I’ve had my eye on with the extremely inspiring Stuart Shils

I took was a drawing class called Reframing the Ordinary, basically about deriving compositions and content from your surroundings as well as retraining your eyes to see. I don’t come from a painting background and never really took painting classes in school, so the class exercises were challenging but super fun. We worked in a timed format on drawings and collages using only black and white and the same scene-I used a corner of my studio as inspiration. Each drawing prompt was different and encouraged focusing on different things each time-ie. the darkest area, the lightest area, where does your eye go first, second, etc. The collages were made using black and white paper and are what I enjoyed the most, especially black on black. Representing value with only one color was also an interesting challenge and encouraged noticing side by side value changes, dark to lights first and then mid-tones. This exercise encouraged imaginative ways to represent lights and darks by shape and texture, especially when only using one color paper. I included two of these collages below as well as a few juicy quotes from the workshop.

In conclusion, the answer to should professional artists take classes is a resounding, yes! And yes, do share with others what classes you take. We all have to help each other out during these times.

All quotes are Stuart Shils unless other wise noted.

• Seeing is forgetting the name of the thing seen. Paul Valery
• Every moment of the day offers opportunity if we are paying attention.
• If you think too hard or plan too much, you make it impossible to embrace the situation with authenticity.
• Landscape is anything that is in front of you.
• Making it simpler does not mean eliminating complexity.
• I don’t think too much about the difficulties, because then I would get stunned or stuck. Pay attention to the feeling instead, the changing, the ripening, the growing.

Workshops! Workshops! Workshops! My 2020-2021 Encaustic Workshop Schedule

Are you in need of something new to occupy your mind in this time of crazy? Take an encaustic workshop to soothe your soul, help you gain perspective, or get out those frustrations by throwing some paint around the room!

Are you in need of something new to occupy your mind in this time of crazy? Take an encaustic workshop to soothe your soul, help you gain perspective, or get out those frustrations by throwing some paint around the room!
Whatever the reason…buy one for someone you love, buy one for yourself or both.
Before choosing a Retreat or Workshop, please be sure to read my Workshop & Retreat Guide to find out if a Workshop or a Retreat experience (or both!) is the best choice for you. Please note that an additional category has been added to my workshop listing..Virtual Workshops! More virtual workshops will soon be added for January-March, so keep up to date by:

1. Checking my web site Events Page
2. Following me on Instagram or Facebook
3. Becoming a member of my New Facebook Group-Full Spectrum: Lorraine Glessner Painting Workshops Forum
4. Signing up for my Newsletter so you can be the first to know of new listings.
5. Asking! Just email me and I’ll send you a link to my latest schedule.

Please don’t hesitate to contact me with questions about any of these Retreats or Workshops.

2020-2021 VIRTUAL WORKSHOP & RETREAT SCHEDULE

MIXED MEDIA ENCAUSTIC COLLAGE
Live Zoom Workshop

October 26-27, 2020
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION



EXPLORING LANDSCAPE IN ENCAUSTIC & THE MARK

A Live Virtual Retreat
December 6-11, 2020
WORKSHOP WEB SITE
WORKSHOP REGISTRATION



2021 IN-PERSON WORKSHOP & RETREAT SCHEDULE


MIXED MEDIA ENCAUSTIC
March 24-26
Aya Fiber Studio, Stuart, Florida
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


ENCAUSTIC COLLAGE
April 16-17
Hunterdon Art Museum, Clinton, New Jersey
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


BEYOND THE BASICS ENCAUSTIC
June 18-22
Peters Valley School of Craft
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


EXPLORING LANDSCAPE THROUGH ENCAUSTIC, MARK-MAKING & THE HANDMADE BOOK
Use discount code: Glessner2021 Hurry, it expires 2/8!
July 11-15
Wild Rice Retreat, Bayfield, Wisconsin
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION

EXPLORING LANDSCAPE IN ENCAUSTIC & THE MARK: A VERMONT ARTIST RETREAT W/DIETLIND VANDER SCHAAF
July 26-30
Lareau Inn & Farm, Waitsfield, Vermont
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


EXPLORING LANDSCAPE THROUGH PHOTOGRAPHY, THE FIGURE & ENCAUSTIC: A VERMONT ARTIST RETREAT W/LEAH MACDONALD
August 9-13
Lareau Inn & Farm, Waitsfield, Vermont
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


MIXED MEDIA ENCAUSTIC: FIBER & STRUCTURE
August 27-29
Schweinfurth Art Center, Auburn, New York
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


EXPLORING LANDSCAPE THROUGH MARKMAKING, JOURNALING & THE BOOK: A TUSCAN ARTIST RETREAT

October 3-7
In Collaboration with Strada Toscana, Tuscany, Italy
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


MIXED MEDIA ENCAUSTIC: TEXTURE & LAYERS
October 28-30
R&F Paints, Kingston, New York
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


NOLA ARTIST RETREAT: A HISTORIC CEMETERY EXPLORATION THROUGH MIXED MEDIA ENCAUSTIC
November 8-12
New Orleans, Louisianna
WORKSHOP WEB SITE & REGISTRATION


5 Reasons Why I Installed My Solo Gallery Show During Covid19 Quarantine

Why did I go ahead with installing a show in the middle of a pandemic? A show that may never have eyes on it other than mine and the gallery owner’s? I list 5 very good reasons why I did it…

Hey, so did you all know I have an actual solo show installed in an actual gallery right in the middle of a national quarantine? The opening, originally scheduled for April 11 was rescheduled as a closing for May 16 and has now been extended to a June 6 closing. (Show details at the end of the article). I was lucky to gain the extension because the artist whose show was scheduled after mine decided to decline because of the virus. Why did I go ahead with installing a show that may never have eyes on it other than mine and the gallery owner’s?

Because….

  1. I’m an artist and it’s what I do. Period. I am an artist. I have art. I have been offered walls in a gallery to hang that art and I’m going to hang it. One of my favorite quotes from the book, Steal Like An Artist, Watch a great musician play a show, watch a great leader give a speech. You’ll see what I mean. You need to find a way to bring your body into your work….you know that phrase ‘going through the motions?’ That’s what’s so great about creative work: if we just start going through the motions, if we strum a guitar or shuffle sticky notes around a conference table, or start kneading clay, the motion kick starts our brain into thinking.
    It’s important for me as an artist to do what I do, to go through the motions no matter the fears I, or anyone else, may have regarding the future.
  2. Hope How many of you have walked down once bustling city streets and peeked into shop windows wishing that you would see a light on or a person working, something that would give you hope? Well, I have peered into shop windows on a few instances and I have found that hope. People walking by the gallery may not be collectors and it may not be an opening, but it just might add hope to the heart of someone glancing in the window of the gallery who sees my art instead of empty white walls.
  3. Art is Meant to be Experienced in Person Kudos and many thanks to those who have organized online exhibitions to brighten art lovers lives during isolation, I have thankfully been a part of a few of these shows. But just like quarantine, online exhibitions are not sustainable in order for art to thrive. Scale, color, sound, smell, texture, touch, not to mention the emotional experience one can rouse from the presence of a piece of art and/or the cohesiveness of entire exhibition. These things are just absent when viewing art online.
  4. Normalcy I needed a bit of it in my life. Taking masked precautions when necessary, I continued to hike, drive, go to the food store and keep appointments when I could throughout the quarantine. So when the gallery owner contacted me and asked if I wanted to go on with the show, my answer was an adamant, Of Course! As we slowly creep out of this isolation and take proper precautions, I will continue to schedule in person shows, workshops, trips and everything else that brings me just a bit closer to normal life and I encourage you, my artist friends (those of you who can do this safely) to do the same.
  5. Art is An Essential Worker Not to undermine the so many brave frontline souls, you are wonderful and thank YOU for doing what you do. So many conversations have been had during this quarantine regarding who is an essential worker, what is an essential product, business, etc. As an artist, I’m guessing art and artists fall somewhere near the bottom of that very long list of essentials. My post, 5 Reasons Why the World Needs Art & Artists argues why art should at least be near the top.

If you’re in the Philadelphia area, please come see my show! All precautions will be taken to keep everyone safe and distant while viewing the art including mandatory mask wearing (I will have a few of my own handmade, hand-dyed, sterilized masks on hand as door prizes for the first 5 attendees!) Limit to 4 people inside the gallery at a time, wrapped refreshments and frequent wiping down of surfaces. Come see!
For those of you who can’t make it, highlights of the show are pictured below.

Lorraine Glessner Solo Show: A Box of Devils
Closing Reception, June 20, 2-5 pm
Boston Street Gallery, Philadelphia, PA
Gallery Web Site

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